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Public Statements

CSAPR Court Ruling

Statement

By:
Date:
Location: Unknown

On Tuesday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit struck down the EPA's Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR). This ruling stops one of the Obama administration's many regulatory assaults on American jobs and economic growth. The court ruling is a big win for Texas jobs and for the state's electric energy supply. CSAPR would have forced closures of facilities in Texas that are an integral part in the state's electric grid, jeopardizing the available supply of power to Texas consumers and businesses. In particular, this rule would have forced the closure of Luminant's generating and related coal facilities in Fairfield, which would have cost the community 500 jobs.

This proposed regulatory overreach by the EPA was based upon faulty science and radical environmental ideology. For too long the EPA has abused its powers and has become a regulatory body that keeps moving the goal posts for the American economy. The court's ruling spares some states from being required to reduce air pollution by more than they actually contribute; an overly burdensome regulation that would continue to impede job growth and disrupt the supply of safe, clean, and affordable energy production.

My office remains committed to returning our federal government to a regulatory structure that is based upon the use of sound science and real-world, cost-benefit analyses. In this regard, we will continue to fight the efforts of unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats that try to impose rules and regulations upon the American economy that exceed their authority as intended by Congressional statutes.


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