Search Form
First, enter a politician or zip code
Now, choose a category

Public Statements

Issue Position: Health Care

Issue Position

By:
Location:

Last year, Congress passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in order to provide quality, affordable health care to millions of Americans who had been ignored and left behind by the current system.

While many of the law's provisions will be phased in throughout the coming years, several important changes have already been implemented. Senior citizens who reached the Medicare prescription drug "donut hole" -- the feared, yet unavoidable gap in coverage that affects millions across the country -- are now assured a rebate so that they don't have to choose between buying food and buying life-saving medicine. Recent college graduates and young adults struggling to find employment or afford a plan of their own now have the option to remain on their parents' insurance plan until they reach the age of 26. This does not cost the government any money and allows young people a safety net, often saving parents thousands of dollars. Americans, both young and old, who were previously denied coverage due to pre-existing conditions are no longer discriminated against by unjust policies. Insurance companies can no longer cherry pick their customers.

Bill's conversations with community members have led him to understand that everyone knows someone who has been positively impacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Furthermore, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office found that repealing the healthcare reform improvements would add over $230 billion to the deficit. There is still work to be done to address small business concerns and help senior citizens understand how this law can work for them, and Bill is working with Democrats, Republicans and Independents to fix outstanding issues.

In addition, as a member of the Congressional Task Force on Alzheimer's Disease, Bill works other members to ensure that research on this tragic disease is sufficiently funded. As District Attorney, he consistently made awareness of Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative diseases a high priority and worked to train law enforcement officials in preventive practices and risk assessment in response to missing persons who suffer from Alzheimer's disease.


Source:
Skip to top
Back to top