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Public Statements

Griffith Supports Protecting Human Spaceflight Act of 2010

Press Release

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Congressman Parker Griffith today announced his support for the Protecting Human Spaceflight Act of 2010. The legislation, introduced by Congressman Robert Aderholt, would ensure that NASA expends all of the funds appropriated to the agency for Fiscal Year 2010. In addition, it would require the amounts appropriated to NASA for the Constellation Program be expended only for carrying out Constellation activities.

"This Administration has repeatedly dismissed the power and responsibility of Congress to produce our nation's budget and set spending priorities. In doing so, it is, in essence, attempting to rule by decree. This is a process that is distinctly un-democratic and un-American.

"North Alabama has lost hundreds of jobs in recent weeks due to NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden's persistent pursuit of his non-procedural policy. Administrator Bolden is improperly side-stepping Congress in an attempt to reach his objective.

"Manned space flight is a critical national security asset and matter of great national prestige. Derailing this disastrous policy is crucial to ensuring the survival of our nation's human spaceflight program.

"I will continue to work with my colleagues to ensure that we soundly reject the President's submission and pass legislation that is respectful of our investments in human spaceflight and the many scientists who have dedicated their lives to this pursuit," said Griffith.

The Protecting Human Spaceflight Act of 2010 would force NASA to continue funding the Constellation rocket program for the rest of the fiscal year. It would require NASA to spend 90 percent of the remaining fun.


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