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Public Statements

Mississippi Awarded $3.8 million Victim Assistance Grant

Press Release

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

U.S. Senator Thad Cochran (R-Miss.) today reported that the state of Mississippi has been awarded a $3.8 million grant to enhance assistance and services for victims of crime.

The Mississippi Division of Public Safety Planning was awarded through the Victim Assistance Formula Grant program that is administered by the Office of Justice Programs within the U.S. Department of Justice.

The bulk of the grant will be awarded by the state to local, community-based public and private nonprofit organizations that provide direct services to crime victims.

"Victims too often face multiple burdens after a crime. This grant is intended to assist organizations and service providers in their efforts to help those whose lives have been disrupted by criminal activities," Cochran said.

The state has the discretion to competitively award victim assistance funds to eligible local organizations, though administrative costs are restricted to 5 percent of the grant award. States are also encouraged to extend services to underserved and rural areas.

While priority attention is given to victims of sexual assault, domestic and child abuse, assistance is also targeted to victims of federal crimes, assaults, robbery, gang violence, hate and bias crimes, intoxicated drivers, economic exploitation, fraud, elder abuse, and survivors of homicide victims.

This federal grant derives from the Crime Victims Fund, which Congress created in the Victims of Crime Act of 1984. The Crime Victims Fund is not financed by tax dollars but by fines and penalties paid by convicted federal offenders, forfeited bail bonds, and special assessments collected by U.S. Attorneys' Offices, federal U.S. courts and the Federal Bureau of Prisons.


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