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Measure Details

The Justice That Works Act of 2016

California Ballot Measure - Proposition 62

Election: Nov. 8, 2016 (General)
Outcome: Failed

Categories:
Crime
Judicial Branch

Yes
6,361,788
(46.85%)

Argument For

No
7,218,625
(53.15%)

Argument Against

Summary

Repeals death penalty and replaces it with life imprisonment without possibility of parole. Applies retroactively to existing death sentences. Increases the portion of life inmates' wages that may be applied to victim restitution. Fiscal Impact: Net ongoing reduction in state and county criminal justice costs of around $150 million annually within a few years, although the impact could vary by tens of millions of dollars depending on various factors.

Measure Text

SECTION 1. Title

This initiative shall be known and maybe cited as "The Justice That Works Act of2016."

SEC. 2. Findings and Declarations

The People of the State of California do hereby find and declare all of the following:

1. Violent killers convicted of first degree murder must be separated from society and severely punished.

2. Under current law, California sentences many criminals to death who commit first degree murder, but the state rarely carries out executions. Instead, the state spends millions of taxpayer dollars providing lawyers for death row inmates, only to see the murderers it has sentenced to death by execution die of old age in prison.

3. Since 1978, California has spent more than $4 billion on a death penalty system that has sentenced nearly one thousand criminals to death by execution but has executed only 13 people. Even though there are over 700 inmates now on death row, California has not executed anyone in almost eleven years.

4. Violent murderers who are sentenced to serve life in prison without the possibility of parole in California are never eligible for parole. They spend the rest of their lives in prison and they die in prison.

5. Fewer than 1% of death row inmates work and pay their wages to compensate their victims. Murderers sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole are required to work in prison and use their wages to pay restitution to the victims of their crimes.

6. All convicted murderers sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole should be legally required to work while in prison and pay 60% of their wages to compensate their victims for the damage they caused.

7. While many think it is cheaper to execute murderers than to imprison them for life, in fact it is far more expensive. The death penalty system costs over $1 00 million more per year to maintain than a system that has life imprisonment without the possibility of parole as its harshest punishment, according to a study by former death penalty prosecutor and judge, Arthur Alarcon, and law professor Paula Mitchell. By replacing the death penalty with life imprisonment without the possibility of parole, California taxpayers would save well over $100 million every year.

8. The death penalty is a failed government program that wastes taxpayer dollars and makes fatal mistakes. More than 150 innocent people have been sentenced to death in this country, and some innocent people have actually been executed. Wrongful convictions rob innocent people of decades of their lives, waste tax dollars, and re-traumatize the victims' families, while the real killers remain free to kill again.

9. Retroactive application of this act will end a costly and ineffective practice immediately and ensure that California never executes an innocent person.

10. California's death penalty is an empty promise. Death penalty cases drag on for decades. A sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole provides swift and certain justice for grieving families.

11. Life in prison without the possibility of parole ensures that the worst criminals stay in prison forever and saves money. By replacing the death penalty with life in prison without the possibility of parole, we would save the state $1 billion in five years without releasing a single prisoner - $1 billion that could be invested in crime prevention strategies, services for victims, education, and keeping our communities and families safe.

SEC. 3. Purpose and Intent

The people of the State of California declare their purpose and intent in enacting the Act to be as follows:

1. To end California's costly and ineffective death penalty system and replace it with a common sense approach that sentences persons convicted of first degree murder with special circumstances to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole so they are permanently separated from society, and required to pay restitution to their victims.

2. To require everyone convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole to work while in prison, and to increase to 60% the portion of wages they must pay as restitution to their victims.

3. To eliminate the risk of executing an innocent person.

4. To end the decades-long appeals process in which grieving family members attending multiple hearings are forced to continually relive the trauma of their loss.

5. To achieve fairness and uniformity in sentencing, through retroactive application of this act to replace the death penalty with life in prison without the possibility of parole.

SEC. 4. Section 190 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

190. (a) Every person guilty of murder in the first degree shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for life without the possibility of parole, or imprisonment in the state prison for a term of 25 years to life. The penalty to be applied shall be determined as provided in Sections 190.2, 190.4, and 190.5. Except as provided in subdivision (b), (c), or (d), every person guilty of murder in the second degree shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for a term of 15 years to life.

(b) Except as provided in subdivision (c), every person guilty of murder in the second degree shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for a term of 25 years to life if the victim was a peace officer, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 830.1, subdivision (a), (b), or (c) of Section 830.2, subdivision (a) of Section 830.33, or Section 830.5, who was killed while engaged in the performance of his or her duties, and the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that the victim was a peace officer engaged in the performance of his or her duties.

(c) Every person guilty of murder in the second degree shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for a term of life without the possibility of parole if the victim was a peace officer, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 830.1, subdivision (a), (b), or (c) of Section 830.2, subdivision (a) of Section 830.33, or Section 830.5, who was killed while engaged in the performance of his or her duties, and the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that the victim was a peace officer engaged in the performance of his or her duties, and any of the following facts has been charged and found true:

(1) The defendant specifically intended to kill the peace officer.
(2) The defendant specifically intended to inflict great bodily injury, as defined in Section 12022.7, on a peace officer.
(3) The defendant personally used a dangerous or deadly weapon in the commission of the offense, in violation of subdivision (b) of Section 12022.
(4) The defendant personally used a firearm in the commission of the offense, in violation of Section 12022.5.

(d) Every person guilty of murder in the second degree shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for a term of 20 years to life if the killing was perpetrated by means of shooting a firearm from a motor vehicle, intentionally at another person outside of the vehicle with the intent to inflict great bodily injury.

(e) Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 2930) of Chapter 7 of Title 1 of Part 3 shall not apply to reduce any minimum term of a sentence imposed pursuant to this section. A person sentenced pursuant to this section shall not be released on parole prior to serving the minimum term of confinement prescribed by this section.

(f) Every person found guilty of murder and sentenced or resentenced to a term of life imprisonment without the possibility of parole pursuant to this section shall be required to work within a high-security prison as many hours of faithful labor in each day and every day during his or her term of imprisonment as shall be prescribed by the rules and regulations of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, pursuant to Section 2 700. In any case where the prisoner owes a restitution fine or restitution order, the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall deduct money from the wages and trust account deposits of the prisoner and shall transfer those funds to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board according to the rules and regulations of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, pursuant to Sections 2085.5 and 2717.8.

SEC. 5. Section 190.1 of the Penal Code is repealed.

SEC. 6. Section 190.2 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

190.2. (a) The penalty for a defendant who is found guilty of murder in the first degree is imprisonment in the state prison for life without the possibility of parole if one or more of the following special circumstances has been found under Section 190.4 to be true:

(1) The murder was intentional and carried out for financial gain.

(2) The defendant was convicted previously of murder in the first or second degree. For the purpose of this paragraph, an offense committed in another jurisdiction, which if committed in California would be punishable as first or second degree murder, shall be deemed murder in the first or second degree.

(3) The defendant, in this proceeding, has been convicted of more than one offense of murder in the first or second degree.

( 4) The murder was committed by means of a destructive device, bomb, or explosive planted, hidden, or concealed in any place, area, dwelling, building, or structure, and the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that his or her act or acts would create a great risk of death to one or more human beings.

(5) The murder was committed for the purpose of avoiding or preventing a lawful arrest, or perfecting or attempting to perfect, an escape from lawful custody.

(6) The murder was committed by means of a destructive device, bomb, or explosive that the defendant mailed or delivered, attempted to mail or deliver, or caused to be mailed or delivered, and the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that his or her act or acts would create a great risk of death to one or more human beings.

(7) The victim was a peace officer, as defined in Section 830.1, 830.2, 830.3, 830.31, 830.32, 830.33, 830.34, 830.35, 830.36, 830.37, 830.4, 830.5, 830.6, 830.10, 830.11, or 830.12, who, while engaged in the course of the performance of his or her duties, was intentionally killed, and the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that the victim was a peace officer engaged in the performance of his or her duties; or the victim was a peace officer, as defined in the above-enumerated sections, or a former peace officer under any of those sections, and was intentionally killed in retaliation for the performance of his or her official duties.

(8) The victim was a federal law enforcement officer or agent who, while engaged in the course of the performance of his or her duties, was intentionally killed, and the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that the victim was a federal law enforcement officer or agent engaged in the performance of his or her duties; or the victim was a federal law enforcement officer or agent, and was intentionally killed in retaliation for the performance of his or her official duties.

(9) The victim was a firefighter, as defined in Section 245.1, who, while engaged in the course of the performance of his or her duties, was intentionally killed, and the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that the victim was a firefighter engaged in the performance of his or her duties.

(10) The victim was a witness to a crime who was intentionally killed for the purpose of preventing his or her testimony in any criminal or juvenile proceeding, and the killing was not committed during the commission or attempted commission, of the crime to which he or she was a witness; or the victim was a witness to a crime and was intentionally killed in retaliation for his or her testimony in any criminal or juvenile proceeding. As used in this paragraph, "juvenile proceeding" means a proceeding brought pursuant to Section 602 or 707 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(11) The victim was a prosecutor or assistant prosecutor or a former prosecutor or assistant prosecutor of any local or state prosecutor's office in this or any other state, or of a federal prosecutor's office, and the murder was intentionally carried out in retaliation for, or to prevent the performance of, the victim's official duties.

(12) The victim was a judge or former judge of any court of record in the local, state, or federal system in this or any other state, and the murder was intentionally carried out in retaliation for, or to prevent the performance of, the victim's official duties.

(13) The victim was an elected or appointed official or former official of the federal government, or of any local or state government of this or any other state, and the killing was intentionally carried out in retaliation for, or to prevent the performance of, the victim's official duties.

(14) The murder was especially heinous, atrocious, or cruel, manifesting exceptional depravity. As used in this section, the phrase "especially heinous, atrocious, or cruel, manifesting exceptional depravity'' means a conscienceless or pitiless crime that is unnecessarily torturous to the victim.

(15) The defendant intentionally killed the victim by means of lying in wait.

(16) The victim was intentionally killed because of his or her race, color, religion, nationality, or country of origin.

(17) The murder was committed while the defendant was engaged in, or was an accomplice in, the commission of, attempted commission of, or the immediate flight after committing, or attempting to commit, the following felonies:

(A) Robbery in violation of Section 211 or 212.5.
(B) Kidnapping in violation of Section 207, 209, or 209.5.
(C) Rape in violation of Section 261.
(D) Sodomy in violation of Section 286.
(E) The performance of a lewd or lascivious act upon the person of a child under the age of 14 years in violation of Section 288.
(F) Oral copulation in violation of Section 288a.
(G) Burglary in the first or second degree in violation of Section 460.
(H) Arson in violation of subdivision (b) of Section 451.
(I) Train wrecking in violation of Section 219.
(J) Mayhem in violation of Section 203.
(K) Rape by instrument in violation of Section 289.
(L) Carjacking, as defined in Section 215.
(M) To prove the special circumstances ofkidnapping in subparagraph (B), or arson in subparagraph (H), if there is specific intent to kill, it is only required that there be proof of the elements of those felonies. If so established, those two special circumstances are proven even if the felony of kidnapping or arson is committed primarily or solely for the purpose of facilitating the murder.

(18) The murder was intentional and involved the infliction of torture.

(19) The defendant intentionally killed the victim by the administration of poison.

(20) The victim was a juror in any court of record in the local, state, or federal system in this or any other state, and the murder was intentionally carried out in retaliation for, or to prevent the performance of, the victim's official duties.

(21) The murder was intentional and perpetrated by means of discharging a firearm from a motor vehicle, intentionally at another person or persons outside the vehicle with the intent to inflict death. For purposes of this paragraph, "motor vehicle" means any vehicle as defined in Section 415 of the Vehicle Code.

(22) The defendant intentionally killed the victim while the defendant was an active participant in a criminal street gang, as defined in subdivision (f) of Section 186.22, and the murder was carried out to further the activities of the criminal street gang.

(b) Unless an intent to kill is specially required under subdivision (a) for a special circumstance enumerated therein, an actual killer, as to whom the special circumstance has been found to be true under Section 190.4, need not have had any intent to kill at the time of the commission of the offense which is the basis of the special circumstance in order to suffer death or confinement in the state prison for life without the possibility of parole.

(c) Every person, not the actual killer, who, with the intent to kill, aids, abets, counsels, commands, induces, solicits, requests, or assists any actor in the commission of murder in the first degree shall be punished by death or imprisonment in the state prison for life without the possibility of parole if one or more of the special circumstances enumerated in subdivision (a) has been found to be true under Section 190.4.

(d) Notwithstanding subdivision (c), every person, not the actual killer, who, with reckless indifference to human life and as a major participant, aids, abets, counsels, commands, induces, solicits, requests, or assists in the commission of a felony enumerated in paragraph (17) of subdivision (a) which results in the death of some person or persons, and who is found guilty of murder in the first degree therefor, shall be punished by death or imprisonment in the state prison for life without the possibility of parole if a special circumstance enumerated in paragraph (17) of subdivision (a) has been found to be true under Section 190.4.

The penalty shall be determined as provided in this section and Sections 190.4, and 190.5.

SEC. 7. Section 190.3 of the Penal Code is repealed.

SEC. 8. Section 190.4 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

190.4. (a) Whenever special circumstances as enumerated in Section 190.2 are alleged and the trier of fact finds the defendant guilty of first degree murder, the trier of fact shall also make a special finding on the truth of each alleged special circumstance. The determination of the truth of any or all of the special circumstances shall be made by the trier of fact on the evidence presented at the trial. In case of a reasonable doubt as to whether a special circumstance is true, the defendant is entitled to a finding that is not true. The trier of fact shall make a special finding that each special circumstance charged is either true or not true. Whenever a special circumstance requires proof of the commission or attempted commission of a crime, such crime shall be charged and proved pursuant to the general law applying to the trial and conviction of the crime. If the defendant was convicted by the court sitting without a jury, the trier of fact shall be a jury unless a jury is waived by the defendant and by the people, in which case the trier of fact shall be the court. If the defendant was convicted by a plea of guilty, the trier of fact shall be a jury unless a jury is waived by the defendant and by the people.

If the trier of fact finds that any one or more of the special circumstances enumerated in Section 190.2 as charged is true, the defendant shall be punished by imprisonment in state prison for life without the possibility of parole.

(b) If the trier of fact which convicted the defendant of a crime for which he may be subject to imprisonment in state prison for life without the possibility of parole was a jury, the same jury shall consider any plea of not guilty by reason of insanity pursuant to Section 1026, and the truth of any special circumstances which may be alleged unless for good cause shown the court discharges that jury in which case a new jury shall be drawn. The court shall state facts in support of the finding of good cause upon the record and cause them to be entered into the minutes.

SEC. 9. Section 2085.5 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

2085.5. (a) (1) In any case in which a prisoner owes a restitution fine imposed pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 13967 of the Government Code, as operative prior to September 29, 1994, subdivision (b) of Section 730.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or subdivision (b) of Section 1202.4, the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall deduct a minimum of 20 percent or the balance owing on the fine amount, whichever is less, up to a maximum of 50 percent from the wages and trust account deposits of a prisoner, unless prohibited by federal law, and shall transfer that amount to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for deposit in the Restitution Fund in the State Treasury. The amount deducted shall be credited against the amount owing on the fine. The sentencing court shall be provided a record of the payments.

(2) In any case in which a prisoner sentenced or resentenced on or after the effective date of this act to a term of life imprisonment without the possibility of parole owes a restitution fine imposed pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 13967 of the Government Code, as operative prior to September 29, 1994, subdivision (b) of Section 730.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or subdivision (b) of Section 1202.4, the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall deduct a minimum of20 percent or the balance owing on the fine amount, whichever is less, up to a maximum of60 percent from the wages and up to a maximum of50 percent from the trust account deposits of a prisoner, unless prohibited by federal law, and shall transfer that amount to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for deposit in the Restitution Fund in the State Treasury. The amount deducted shall be credited against the amount owing on the fine. The sentencing court shall be provided a record of the payments.

(b) (1) When a prisoner is punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, in any case in which a prisoner owes a restitution fine imposed pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 13967 of the Government Code, as operative prior to September 29, 1994, subdivision (b) of Section 730.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or subdivision (b) of Section 1202.4, the agency designated by the board of supervisors in the county where the prisoner is incarcerated is authorized to deduct a minimum of 20 percent or the balance owing on the fine amount, whichever is less, up to a maximum of 50 percent from the county jail equivalent of wages and trust account deposits of a prisoner, unless prohibited by federal law, and shall transfer that amount to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for deposit in the Restitution Fund in the State Treasury. The amount deducted shall be credited against the amount owing on the fine. The sentencing court shall be provided a record of the payments.

(2) If the board of supervisors designates the county sheriff as the collecting agency, the board of supervisors shall first obtain the concurrence of the county sheriff.

(c) (1) In any case in which a prisoner owes a restitution order imposed pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 13967 of the Government Code, as operative prior to September 29, 1994, subdivision (h) of Section 730.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or subdivision (f) of Section 1202.4, the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall deduct a minimum of 20 percent or the balance owing on the order amount, whichever is less, up to a maximum of 50 percent from the wages and trust account deposits of a prisoner, unless prohibited by federal law. The secretary shall transfer that amount to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for direct payment to the victim, or payment shall be made to the Restitution Fund to the extent that the victim has received assistance pursuant to that program. The sentencing court shall be provided a record of the payments made to victims and of the payments deposited to the Restitution Fund pursuant to this subdivision.

(2) In any case in which a prisoner sentenced or resentenced on or after the effective date of this act to a term of life imprisonment without the possibility of parole owes a restitution order imposed pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 13967 of the Government Code, as operative prior to September 29, 1994, subdivision (h) of Section 730.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or subdivision (f) of Section 1202.4, the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall deduct a minimum of20 percent or the balance owing on the order amount, whichever is less, up to a maximum of60 percent from the wages and up to a maximum of50 percent from the trust account deposits of a prisoner, unless prohibited by federal law. The secretary shall transfer that amount to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for direct payment to the victim, or payment shall be made to the Restitution Fund to the extent that the victim has received assistance pursuant to that program. The sentencing court shall be provided a record of the payments made to victims and of the payments deposited to the Restitution Fund pursuant to this subdivision.

(d) When a prisoner is punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, in any case in which a prisoner owes a restitution order imposed pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 13967 of the Government Code, as operative prior to September 29, 1994, subdivision (h) of Section 730.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or subdivision (b) of Section 1202.4, the agency designated by the board of supervisors in the county where the prisoner is incarcerated is authorized to deduct a minimum of 20 percent or the balance owing on the order amount, whichever is less, up to a maximum of 50 percent from the county jail equivalent of wages and trust account deposits of a prisoner, unless prohibited by federal law. The agency shall transfer that amount to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for direct payment to the victim, or payment shall be made to the Restitution Fund to the extent that the victim has received assistance pursuant to that program, or may pay the victim directly. The sentencing court shall be provided a record of the payments made to the victims and of the payments deposited to the Restitution Fund pursuant to this subdivision.

(e) The secretary shall deduct and retain from the wages and trust account deposits of a prisoner, unless prohibited by federal law, an administrative fee that totals 10 percent of any amount transferred to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board pursuant to subdivision (a) or (c). The secretary shall deduct and retain from any prisoner settlement or trial award, an administrative fee that totals 5 percent of any amount paid from the settlement or award to satisfy an outstanding restitution order or fine pursuant to subdivision (n), unless prohibited by federal law. The secretary shall deposit the administrative fee moneys in a special deposit account for reimbursing administrative and support costs of the restitution program of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. The secretary, at his or her discretion, may retain any excess funds in the special deposit account for future reimbursement of the department's administrative and support costs for the restitution program or may transfer all or part of the excess funds for deposit in the Restitution Fund.

(f) When a prisoner is punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, the agency designated by the board of supervisors in the county where the prisoner is incarcerated is authorized to deduct and retain from the county jail equivalent of wages and trust account deposits of a prisoner, unless prohibited by federal law, an administrative fee that totals 10 percent of any amount transferred to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board pursuant to subdivision (b) or (d). The agency is authorized to deduct and retain from a prisoner settlement or trial award, an administrative fee that totals 5 percent of any amount paid from the settlement or award to satisfy an outstanding restitution order or fine pursuant to subdivision (n), unless prohibited by federal law. Upon release from custody pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, the agency is authorized to charge a fee to cover the actual administrative cost of collection, not to exceed 10 percent of the total amount collected. The agency shall deposit the administrative fee moneys in a special deposit account for reimbursing administrative and support costs of the restitution program of the agency. The agency is authorized to retain any excess funds in the special deposit account for future reimbursement of the agency's administrative and support costs for the restitution program or may transfer all or part of the excess funds for deposit in the Restitution Fund. (g) In any case in which a parolee owes a restitution fine imposed pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 13967 of the Government Code, as operative prior to September 29, 1994, subdivision (b) of Section 730.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or subdivision (b) of Section 1202.4, the secretary, or, when a prisoner is punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, the agency designated by the board of supervisors in the county where the prisoner is incarcerated, may collect from the parolee or, pursuant to Section 2085.6, from a person previously imprisoned in county jail any moneys owing on the restitution fine amount, unless prohibited by federal law. The secretary or the agency shall transfer that amount to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for deposit in the Restitution Fund in the State Treasury. The amount deducted shall be credited against the amount owing on the fine. The sentencing court shall be provided a record of the payments.

(h) In any case in which a parolee owes a direct order of restitution, imposed pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 13967 of the Government Code, as operative prior to September 29, 1994, subdivision (h) of Section 730.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 1202.4, the secretary, or, when a prisoner is punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, the agency designated by the board of supervisors in the county where the prisoner is incarcerated or a local collection program, may collect from the parolee or, pursuant to Section 2085.6, from a person previously imprisoned in county jail any moneys owing, unless prohibited by federal law. The secretary or the agency shall transfer that amount to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for direct payment to the victim, or payment shall be made to the Restitution Fund to the extent that the victim has received assistance pursuant to that program, or the agency may pay the victim directly. The sentencing court shall be provided a record of the payments made by the offender pursuant to this subdivision.

(i) The secretary, or, when a prisoner is punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, the agency designated by the board of supervisors in the county where the prisoner is incarcerated, may deduct and retain from moneys collected from parolees or persons previously imprisoned in county jail an administrative fee that totals 10 percent of any amount transferred to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board pursuant to subdivision (g) or (h), unless prohibited by federal law. The secretary shall deduct and retain from any settlement or trial award of a parolee an administrative fee that totals 5 percent of an amount paid from the settlement or award to satisfy an outstanding restitution
order or fine pursuant to subdivision (n), unless prohibited by federal law. The agency is authorized to deduct and retain from any settlement or trial award of a person previously imprisoned in county jail an administrative fee that totals 5 percent of any amount paid from the settlement or award to satisfy an outstanding restitution order or fine pursuant to subdivision (n). The secretary or the agency shall deposit the administrative fee moneys in a special deposit account for reimbursing administrative and support costs of the restitution program of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or the agency, as applicable. The secretary, at his or her discretion, or the agency may retain any excess funds in the special deposit account for future reimbursement of the department's or agency's administrative and support costs for the restitution program or may transfer all or part of the excess funds for deposit in the Restitution Fund.

(j) When a prisoner has both a restitution fine and a restitution order from the sentencing court, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall collect the restitution order first pursuant to subdivision (c).

(k) When a prisoner is punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 11 70 and that prisoner has both a restitution fine and a restitution order from the sentencing court, if the agency designated by the board of supervisors in the county where the prisoner is incarcerated collects the fine and order, the agency shall collect the restitution order first pursuant to subdivision (d).

(l) When a parolee has both a restitution fine and a restitution order from the sentencing court, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, or, when the prisoner is punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, the agency designated by the board of supervisors in the county where the prisoner is incarcerated, may collect the restitution order first, pursuant to subdivision (h).

(m) If an inmate is housed at an institution that requires food to be purchased from the institution canteen for unsupervised overnight visits, and if the money for the purchase of this food is received from funds other than the inmate's wages, that money shall be exempt from restitution deductions. This exemption shall apply to the actual amount spent on food for the visit up to a maximum of fifty dollars ($50) for visits that include the inmate and one visitor, seventy dollars ($70) for visits that include the inmate and two or three visitors, and eighty dollars ($80) for visits that include the inmate and four or more visitors.

(n) Compensatory or punitive damages awarded by trial or settlement to any inmate, parolee, person placed on postrelease community supervision pursuant to Section 3451, or defendant on mandatory supervision imposed pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph ( 5) of subdivision (h) of Section 1170, in connection with a civil action brought against a federal, state, or local jail, prison, or correctional facility, or any official or agent thereof, shall be paid directly, after payment of reasonable attorney's fees and litigation costs approved by the court, to satisfy any outstanding restitution orders or restitution fines against that person. The balance of the award shall be forwarded to the payee after full payment of all outstanding restitution orders and restitution fines, subject to subdivisions (e) and (i). The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall make all reasonable efforts to notify the victims of the crime for which that person was convicted concerning the pending payment of any compensatory or punitive damages. For any prisoner punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, the agency is authorized to make all reasonable efforts to notify the victims of the crime for which that person was convicted concerning the pending payment of any compensatory or punitive damages.

(o) (1) Amounts transferred to the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for payment of direct orders of restitution shall be paid to the victim within 60 days from the date the restitution revenues are received by the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board. If the restitution payment to a victim is less than fifty dollars ($50), then payment need not be forwarded to that victim until the payment reaches fifty dollars ($50) or until180 days from the date the first payment is received, whichever occurs sooner.
(2) If a victim cannot be located, the restitution revenues received by the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board on behalf of the victim shall be held in trust in the Restitution Fund until the end of the state fiscal year subsequent to the state fiscal year in which the funds were deposited or until the time that the victim has provided current address information, whichever occurs sooner. Amounts remaining in trust at the end of the specified period of time shall revert to the Restitution Fund.

(3) (A) A victim failing to provide a current address within the period oftime specified in paragraph (2) may provide documentation to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, which shall verify that moneys were collected on behalf of the victim. Upon receipt of that verified information from the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board shall transmit the restitution revenues to the victim in accordance with the provisions of subdivision (c) or (h).

(B) A victim failing to provide a current address within the period of time specified in paragraph (2) may provide documentation to the agency designated by the board of supervisors in the county where the prisoner punished by imprisonment in a county jail pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170 is incarcerated, which may verify that moneys were collected on behalf of the victim. Upon receipt of that verified information from the agency, the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board shall transmit the restitution revenues to the victim in accordance with the provisions of subdivision (d) or (h).

SEC. 10. Retroactive Application of Act

(a) In order to best achieve the purpose of this act as stated in Section 3 and to achieve fairness, equality and uniformity in sentencing, this act shall be applied retroactively.

(b) In any case where a defendant or inmate was sentenced to death prior to the effective date of this act, the sentence shall automatically be converted to imprisonment in the state prison for life without the possibility of parole under the terms and conditions of this act. The State of California shall not carry out any execution following the effective date of this act.

(c) Following the effective date of this act, the Supreme Court may transfer all death penalty appeals and habeas petitions pending before the Supreme Court to any district of the Court of Appeal or superior court, in the Supreme Court's discretion.

SEC. 11. Effective Date

This act shall become effective on the day following the election pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 10 of Article II of the California Constitution.

SEC. 12. Severability

The provisions of this act are severable. If any provision of this act or its application is held invalid, including but not limited to Section 10, that invalidity shall not affect other provisions or applications that can be given effect without the invalid provision or application.

*Text stricken from the original bill is not included in this version.

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