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Waving Points of Order Against Conference Report on H.Con.Res 95, Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 2006

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Location: Washington, DC


WAIVING POINTS OF ORDER AGAINST CONFERENCE REPORT ON H. CON. RES. 95, CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006 -- (House of Representatives - April 28, 2005)

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Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I thank the elderly gentleman from Florida for yielding me this time.

Mr. Speaker, I wish to speak in favor of this rule and in favor of this budget. It all comes down to priorities, Mr. Speaker: how are we going to balance the budget. There are different ways of doing it. We believe the way to balance the budget is grow the economy and create more jobs and control spending. What the other side has said they want to do is raise taxes. You can raise taxes, but you will hurt jobs.

What we have done in the last year is remarkable, Mr. Speaker. The budget deficit has gone down from a projected $521 billion, down by 20 percent over the last year, to $412 billion, largely because of increased jobs and economic activity.

Now, what we want to do to ensure that we cut the deficit in half over 5 years and, hopefully, exceed that goal is control spending. For the first time since the Reagan administration, we are actually going to reduce nonsecurity discretionary spending, an actual reduction in expenditures on nonsecurity discretionary spending. That is a great step in the right direction.

For the first time since 1997, we are actually going to address entitlement reform. Fifty-four percent of the Federal budget, Mr. Speaker, is on auto pilot, our entitlements. We are finally going to be trying to control the growth of entitlements. Is it Draconian? Hardly. We are growing entitlements at 5.6 percent instead of 5.7 percent over the next 10 years. In fact, those who say that this bill cuts Medicaid are simply missing the mark. Medicaid is going to grow at 7.3 percent instead of 7.6 percent. So for the next 5 years, Medicaid will spend $1,112,808,000,000. That is $1,112,800,000. Instead, Medicaid will now spend $1,102,800,000,000. We are talking about growing Medicaid at 7.3 percent instead of 7.6 percent. We are talking about getting a handle on out-of-control spending so we can control spending to reduce the deficit.

It is all about priorities, Mr. Speaker. We believe that the money that is made in America, the money that comes to the Federal Government through revenues is not our money, it is our constituents' money, it is the taxpayers' money. We believe we have an obligation to be good stewards of taxpayers' dollars. We believe that there is waste, fraud, and abuse in the Federal Government; and we believe that everything the Federal Government is doing is not being done exactly right, that we can reform, get better use of our tax dollars, and get better savings so that we can get rid of this budget deficit. We have already reduced the deficit by 20 percent.

We need to keep good jobs, keep the economy growing, and control spending. That is exactly what this budget does. It has unprecedented advances. The first time we are actually getting some spending control on mandatory spending since 1997; the first time we are actually reducing nonsecurity spending and discretionary since the Reagan administration.

It is a good budget, and I urge its support.

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