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Disapproval Resolution Relating to Debt Limit Increase

Floor Speech

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

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Mr. STUTZMAN. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my friend from Indiana (Mr. Young) for introducing this resolution.

This is about communicating with the American people. I am not quite sure what to say after the last speaker, who said he was a partisan Democrat, would not want to come together, both parties, to work together to find a problem to the $17 trillion of debt that we have. That seems to be more of the problem in Washington today--the fact that parties don't want to work together to find a problem to the threat to our children and our grandchildren.

Mr. Young mentioned earlier that that was the reason that he ran for office--because of the $17 trillion of debt that at the time in 2010 was roughly closer to $13 trillion and has only exceeded that since we have been elected to office.

We are Americans first--not partisans, Americans--who believe that we need to pass on a better future for our children and our grandchildren and for future generations here in America. That is what is wrong with Washington: too many partisans.

I believe we have got to find solutions that are going to balance the budget, like Americans do across the country every day, whether it is filling up gas at the gas station or whether it is the book dues for the kids at school, health care costs, the cost of utilities.

People are trying to make ends meet. Instead, Washington is only making it harder, through partisanship, on the American people. Both parties, Republican and Democrat, have driven Washington $17 trillion in debt. For decades, Republicans and Democrats offered empty promises and cheap excuses, but our fiscal crisis cannot be ignored any more.

The national debt now exceeds our gross domestic product and saddles every American with a $53,000 share of Washington's red ink. The facts are very clear. Our current path is unsustainable. Although Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security will grow dramatically over the next decade, recent budget debates between Congress and the White House have largely ignored these key drivers of the debt. So what is going to happen? Washington is going to continue to stumble from one crisis to the next. This is no way to run a country.

Madam Speaker, it is irresponsible to raise the debt ceiling without tackling the underlying spending problems of this crisis. Hoosiers don't expect Republicans and Democrats to agree on every proposal, but they do expect us to make the difficult choices to put us on a path of fiscal stability. Now is the time for both parties to break Washington's cycle of manufactured crises and pay down our debt.

I thank the gentleman for bringing this resolution to the floor of the House so we can discuss not only the spending problems, but what is the problem underlying the spending habits and the spending problems in Washington. Is it just ObamaCare, as the gentleman said previously? ObamaCare is part of the problem of our spending in Washington. Washington continues to look out for Washington interests and special interests rather than looking out for American interests.

Mr. Young, thank you for bringing this important resolution. If there is anything that threatens our security, it is our national debt. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2011, Admiral Mike Mullen, said that this is the greatest threat to our national security.

The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. Foxx). The time of the gentleman has expired.

Mr. YOUNG of Indiana. Madam Speaker, I yield the gentleman an additional 1 minute.

Mr. STUTZMAN. I thank the gentleman.

As I mentioned, Admiral Mike Mullen, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2011, after the last debt ceiling discussion in July and August of 2011, said that the debt was the greatest threat to our national security.

Not only is it a threat to our ability to protect our country militarily, but it is an even greater threat to our country economically. Families are feeling the brunt day to day in the fact that salaries are not increasing, jobs are not being created. This is the fundamental crisis that our country is facing today, and we do need to talk about it, and we do need to share with one another here in Congress ideas and ways that we can tackle our debt problems.

Mr. Young, thank you for this resolution. I proudly support it, and I am glad to work with anyone, Republican or Democrat, to tackle our debt problems.

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