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Public Statements

Center For American Progress 10th Anniversary Policy Conference

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Good afternoon. Thank you, Neera, for that kind introduction. And congratulations to you, and to John, and to everyone who's been associated with CAP or encouraging CAP for the last 10 years.

CAP's work over the last 10 years has shown us the way forward.

It is the way to a future of greater opportunity for all.

It is a future of more opportunity for our children, not less. More education, not less. More jobs, not less. More freedom, not less. A society that is more open and more inclusive, not less.

This is the future that we're building in Maryland

A future we create by the better choices we make together.

Together we have made Maryland's public schools the best in the nation now for five years in a row.

Together we have made college education in our state more affordable instead of more expensive.

Together we have accelerated the innovation curve in the new job-creating sectors of life science, biotech, green tech, cybersecurity, global trade, advanced manufacturing.

Together we are rebuilding a 21st century infrastructure of roads, rails, bridges, transit, water, and broadband upon which all commerce and creative business depends.

And we're doing all of this in a fiscally responsible way.

Our approach is a balanced approach -- reducing inherited deficits, reforming pension systems, and maintaining a triple-A bond rating all through the brutally hard years of the Bush recession: one of only seven states able to make that claim.

Results

The results, so far, speak for themselves. And while our work continues, we have now recovered 100 percent of the jobs we lost in the national recession. In fact, we're creating jobs at the fastest rate in the region over the last year, and nearly twice as fast as our neighbors in Virginia.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has now for two years in a row named Maryland the #1 State in America for innovation and entrepreneurship.

Our people have earned the highest median income in the country.

And most importantly, we are among the top three states in the nation for upward economic mobility.

Not by chance, but by choice.

Diversity is our greatest strength

You see, the most important asset we have in Maryland is not NIH or even Johns Hopkins -- it is the belief we share in the dignity of every individual.

In Maryland, we believe our diversity is our greatest strength and that we all do better when we're all doing better.

More than half of Maryland's population growth (55 percent) since 2000 is due to growing immigrant communities.

Our State is a place where people of many and varied backgrounds are willing to risk action on the faith that their hard work will make a better future -- a better future for themselves and their families and their businesses.

The point is this:

Building an Innovation Economy -- creating jobs and expanding opportunity -- requires more than smart investments, it requires smart and inclusive policies based on the belief we share in the dignity of every individual.

Things like equal rights, inclusion, an open society where all are encouraged to participate, to vote, to work and to create -- these choices are also essential for growing a creative, innovative economy.

This is why we're working to close the achievement gap between our low-income students, and their peers.

This is why we have cut the achievement gap between white and black students in elementary school reading and math by more than 25 percent.

Maryland's low-income students, of all races, are now making greater strides in achievement than in any other state.

This is why we've set and exceeded the country's most ambitious goal for minority- and women-owned business participation in State contracts.

Just since 2007, we've increased minority business participation by 70 percent. Our minority businesses now win more than a quarter of all state contracts.

Women now own one-third of all businesses in our State -- a higher concentration than in any other state. We now have the lowest gender wage gap of any state, and the third lowest poverty rate among women.

Forbes magazine this year named Baltimore one of the top two metro areas in U.S. for minority entrepreneurs.

Not by chance, but by choice.

One person can make a difference, each of us must try, each of us is needed.

In other states

My friend, Paul Hawken, rightly ponts out, "Ecologists and biologists know that systems achieve stability and health through diversity, not uniformity. Ideologues take the opposite view."

In other states, narrow ideologies are rolling back voting rights, rolling back women's rights, and rolling back workers' rights.

In Maryland, we want more people to vote, not less. We want more people to participate more fully. We want more people to open businesses, not less. And we want more opportunity, not less.

In other states, they're passing laws that restrict voting, laws that ban civil marriage equality, laws that stigmatize immigrants and limit the dreams and potential of children.

These poor choices, and the poorer results they bring --inequality, exclusivity, intolerance, disparity and division-- these poor choices weaken the common good we share, and they weaken our economy.

Sadly, in this year alone, nine different states have passed laws restricting access to the polls. Our neighbors in Virginia will now have to present a photo ID to vote. In North Carolina, they've eliminated same-day registration and cut back on early voting.

These laws are designed to make it more difficult for people to vote, and they disproportionately affect minorities, older Americans, poor people, and young people. By discouraging individual participation, these laws also threaten productivity and creativity -- they slow economic growth.

It's hard to think of anything more contrary to the spirit of American democracy than trying to prevent those who disagree with you from having their voice heard.

In another example of putting ideology over economic good, States that continue to block marriage equality rights are not only denying the dignity of same sex couples and the equal protection of their children's homes, but these states are also limiting their job creating potential; they are undermining their own economic competitiveness.

Consider this:

During the recent Supreme Court rulings on same-sex marriage, leading innovation companies rallied behind the right of all couples to be treated equal under the law.

They did this, in part, because it means all employees will receive the same federal benefits. But also because inclusion means they can attract the best talent out there. States that ban same-sex marriage are losing out.
Good afternoon. Thank you, Neera, for that kind introduction. And congratulations to you, and to John, and to everyone who's been associated with CAP or encouraging CAP for the last 10 years.

CAP's work over the last 10 years has shown us the way forward.

It is the way to a future of greater opportunity for all.

It is a future of more opportunity for our children, not less. More education, not less. More jobs, not less. More freedom, not less. A society that is more open and more inclusive, not less.

This is the future that we're building in Maryland

A future we create by the better choices we make together.

Together we have made Maryland's public schools the best in the nation now for five years in a row.

Together we have made college education in our state more affordable instead of more expensive.

Together we have accelerated the innovation curve in the new job-creating sectors of life science, biotech, green tech, cybersecurity, global trade, advanced manufacturing.

Together we are rebuilding a 21st century infrastructure of roads, rails, bridges, transit, water, and broadband upon which all commerce and creative business depends.

And we're doing all of this in a fiscally responsible way.

Our approach is a balanced approach -- reducing inherited deficits, reforming pension systems, and maintaining a triple-A bond rating all through the brutally hard years of the Bush recession: one of only seven states able to make that claim.

Results

The results, so far, speak for themselves. And while our work continues, we have now recovered 100 percent of the jobs we lost in the national recession. In fact, we're creating jobs at the fastest rate in the region over the last year, and nearly twice as fast as our neighbors in Virginia.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has now for two years in a row named Maryland the #1 State in America for innovation and entrepreneurship.

Our people have earned the highest median income in the country.

And most importantly, we are among the top three states in the nation for upward economic mobility.

Not by chance, but by choice.

Diversity is our greatest strength

You see, the most important asset we have in Maryland is not NIH or even Johns Hopkins -- it is the belief we share in the dignity of every individual.

In Maryland, we believe our diversity is our greatest strength and that we all do better when we're all doing better.

More than half of Maryland's population growth (55 percent) since 2000 is due to growing immigrant communities.

Our State is a place where people of many and varied backgrounds are willing to risk action on the faith that their hard work will make a better future -- a better future for themselves and their families and their businesses.

The point is this:

Building an Innovation Economy -- creating jobs and expanding opportunity -- requires more than smart investments, it requires smart and inclusive policies based on the belief we share in the dignity of every individual.

Things like equal rights, inclusion, an open society where all are encouraged to participate, to vote, to work and to create -- these choices are also essential for growing a creative, innovative economy.

This is why we're working to close the achievement gap between our low-income students, and their peers.

This is why we have cut the achievement gap between white and black students in elementary school reading and math by more than 25 percent.

Maryland's low-income students, of all races, are now making greater strides in achievement than in any other state.

This is why we've set and exceeded the country's most ambitious goal for minority- and women-owned business participation in State contracts.

Just since 2007, we've increased minority business participation by 70 percent. Our minority businesses now win more than a quarter of all state contracts.

Women now own one-third of all businesses in our State -- a higher concentration than in any other state. We now have the lowest gender wage gap of any state, and the third lowest poverty rate among women.

Forbes magazine this year named Baltimore one of the top two metro areas in U.S. for minority entrepreneurs.

Not by chance, but by choice.

One person can make a difference, each of us must try, each of us is needed.

In other states

My friend, Paul Hawken, rightly ponts out, "Ecologists and biologists know that systems achieve stability and health through diversity, not uniformity. Ideologues take the opposite view."

In other states, narrow ideologies are rolling back voting rights, rolling back women's rights, and rolling back workers' rights.
Good afternoon. Thank you, Neera, for that kind introduction. And congratulations to you, and to John, and to everyone who's been associated with CAP or encouraging CAP for the last 10 years.

CAP's work over the last 10 years has shown us the way forward.

It is the way to a future of greater opportunity for all.

It is a future of more opportunity for our children, not less. More education, not less. More jobs, not less. More freedom, not less. A society that is more open and more inclusive, not less.

This is the future that we're building in Maryland

A future we create by the better choices we make together.

Together we have made Maryland's public schools the best in the nation now for five years in a row.

Together we have made college education in our state more affordable instead of more expensive.

Together we have accelerated the innovation curve in the new job-creating sectors of life science, biotech, green tech, cybersecurity, global trade, advanced manufacturing.

Together we are rebuilding a 21st century infrastructure of roads, rails, bridges, transit, water, and broadband upon which all commerce and creative business depends.

And we're doing all of this in a fiscally responsible way.

Our approach is a balanced approach -- reducing inherited deficits, reforming pension systems, and maintaining a triple-A bond rating all through the brutally hard years of the Bush recession: one of only seven states able to make that claim.

Results

The results, so far, speak for themselves. And while our work continues, we have now recovered 100 percent of the jobs we lost in the national recession. In fact, we're creating jobs at the fastest rate in the region over the last year, and nearly twice as fast as our neighbors in Virginia.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has now for two years in a row named Maryland the #1 State in America for innovation and entrepreneurship.

Our people have earned the highest median income in the country.

And most importantly, we are among the top three states in the nation for upward economic mobility.

Not by chance, but by choice.

Diversity is our greatest strength

You see, the most important asset we have in Maryland is not NIH or even Johns Hopkins -- it is the belief we share in the dignity of every individual.

In Maryland, we believe our diversity is our greatest strength and that we all do better when we're all doing better.

More than half of Maryland's population growth (55 percent) since 2000 is due to growing immigrant communities.

Our State is a place where people of many and varied backgrounds are willing to risk action on the faith that their hard work will make a better future -- a better future for themselves and their families and their businesses.

The point is this:

Building an Innovation Economy -- creating jobs and expanding opportunity -- requires more than smart investments, it requires smart and inclusive policies based on the belief we share in the dignity of every individual.

Things like equal rights, inclusion, an open society where all are encouraged to participate, to vote, to work and to create -- these choices are also essential for growing a creative, innovative economy.

This is why we're working to close the achievement gap between our low-income students, and their peers.

This is why we have cut the achievement gap between white and black students in elementary school reading and math by more than 25 percent.

Maryland's low-income students, of all races, are now making greater strides in achievement than in any other state.

This is why we've set and exceeded the country's most ambitious goal for minority- and women-owned business participation in State contracts.

Just since 2007, we've increased minority business participation by 70 percent. Our minority businesses now win more than a quarter of all state contracts.

Women now own one-third of all businesses in our State -- a higher concentration than in any other state. We now have the lowest gender wage gap of any state, and the third lowest poverty rate among women.

Forbes magazine this year named Baltimore one of the top two metro areas in U.S. for minority entrepreneurs.

Not by chance, but by choice.

One person can make a difference, each of us must try, each of us is needed.

In other states

My friend, Paul Hawken, rightly ponts out, "Ecologists and biologists know that systems achieve stability and health through diversity, not uniformity. Ideologues take the opposite view."

In other states, narrow ideologies are rolling back voting rights, rolling back women's rights, and rolling back workers' rights.

In Maryland, we want more people to vote, not less. We want more people to participate more fully. We want more people to open businesses, not less. And we want more opportunity, not less.

In other states, they're passing laws that restrict voting, laws that ban civil marriage equality, laws that stigmatize immigrants and limit the dreams and potential of children.

These poor choices, and the poorer results they bring --inequality, exclusivity, intolerance, disparity and division-- these poor choices weaken the common good we share, and they weaken our economy.

Sadly, in this year alone, nine different states have passed laws restricting access to the polls. Our neighbors in Virginia will now have to present a photo ID to vote. In North Carolina, they've eliminated same-day registration and cut back on early voting.

These laws are designed to make it more difficult for people to vote, and they disproportionately affect minorities, older Americans, poor people, and young people. By discouraging individual participation, these laws also threaten productivity and creativity -- they slow economic growth.

It's hard to think of anything more contrary to the spirit of American democracy than trying to prevent those who disagree with you from having their voice heard.

In another example of putting ideology over economic good, States that continue to block marriage equality rights are not only denying the dignity of same sex couples and the equal protection of their children's homes, but these states are also limiting their job creating potential; they are undermining their own economic competitiveness.

Consider this:

During the recent Supreme Court rulings on same-sex marriage, leading innovation companies rallied behind the right of all couples to be treated equal under the law.

They did this, in part, because it means all employees will receive the same federal benefits. But also because inclusion means they can attract the best talent out there. States that ban same-sex marriage are losing out.

Just this week, the Chamber of Commerce in Indianapolis joined other business groups to oppose a ban on civil unions for same-sex couples. They did this because of how the law would affect Indiana's "competitiveness on a national and global level."

Likewise, States that pursue nativist, "Know Nothing" policies openly hostile to new Americans and immigration reform are also limiting their economic potential and slowing their ability to create the better paying jobs of the future.

In Arizona, extreme immigration enforcement laws led to a $253 million hit to the tourism industry. In just a year after the law went into effect, more than 2,700 moms and dads lost their jobs.

These laws do nothing to protect American citizens, but they do make states less attractive for tourism, for trade, and for business expansion.

With the exception of our Native American brothers and sisters, all of our people were once strangers in a strange land. But the dreams we have for our children are purely American.

In Maryland, we passed the DREAM Act, we passed Civil Marriage Equality, and we have made it easier for more people to vote in our elections and to participate in our economy.

Better choices, better results.

Best Days Ahead

Promoting the right to vote, guaranteeing marriage equality, and treating immigrants with respect and dignity…, these things all make Maryland stronger.

Bigotry does not create jobs; division does not expand economic opportunity; isolation kills innovation.

The research of economist Richard Florida, has shown over the years that inclusiveness correlates to more venture capital

Inclusiveness correlates to higher wages.

Full participation -- in a society that values diversity -- correlates to more start-ups, more innovation, and better paying jobs.

Here at the Center for American Progress, we see an America whose best days are ahead of us.

We see an inclusive America that is, once again, growing her economy, creating jobs and expanding opportunity.

We see a future with a stronger and growing American middle class.

What we want for our children is a country of more opportunity, not a country of less.

What was true for our parents and grandparents is still true for us -- we are all in this together, and -- economically -- we all do better when we are all doing better.
In Maryland, we want more people to vote, not less. We want more people to participate more fully. We want more people to open businesses, not less. And we want more opportunity, not less.

In other states, they're passing laws that restrict voting, laws that ban civil marriage equality, laws that stigmatize immigrants and limit the dreams and potential of children.

These poor choices, and the poorer results they bring --inequality, exclusivity, intolerance, disparity and division-- these poor choices weaken the common good we share, and they weaken our economy.

Sadly, in this year alone, nine different states have passed laws restricting access to the polls. Our neighbors in Virginia will now have to present a photo ID to vote. In North Carolina, they've eliminated same-day registration and cut back on early voting.

These laws are designed to make it more difficult for people to vote, and they disproportionately affect minorities, older Americans, poor people, and young people. By discouraging individual participation, these laws also threaten productivity and creativity -- they slow economic growth.

It's hard to think of anything more contrary to the spirit of American democracy than trying to prevent those who disagree with you from having their voice heard.

In another example of putting ideology over economic good, States that continue to block marriage equality rights are not only denying the dignity of same sex couples and the equal protection of their children's homes, but these states are also limiting their job creating potential; they are undermining their own economic competitiveness.

Consider this:

During the recent Supreme Court rulings on same-sex marriage, leading innovation companies rallied behind the right of all couples to be treated equal under the law.

They did this, in part, because it means all employees will receive the same federal benefits. But also because inclusion means they can attract the best talent out there. States that ban same-sex marriage are losing out.

Just this week, the Chamber of Commerce in Indianapolis joined other business groups to oppose a ban on civil unions for same-sex couples. They did this because of how the law would affect Indiana's "competitiveness on a national and global level."

Likewise, States that pursue nativist, "Know Nothing" policies openly hostile to new Americans and immigration reform are also limiting their economic potential and slowing their ability to create the better paying jobs of the future.

In Arizona, extreme immigration enforcement laws led to a $253 million hit to the tourism industry. In just a year after the law went into effect, more than 2,700 moms and dads lost their jobs.

These laws do nothing to protect American citizens, but they do make states less attractive for tourism, for trade, and for business expansion.

With the exception of our Native American brothers and sisters, all of our people were once strangers in a strange land. But the dreams we have for our children are purely American.

In Maryland, we passed the DREAM Act, we passed Civil Marriage Equality, and we have made it easier for more people to vote in our elections and to participate in our economy.

Better choices, better results.

Best Days Ahead

Promoting the right to vote, guaranteeing marriage equality, and treating immigrants with respect and dignity…, these things all make Maryland stronger.

Bigotry does not create jobs; division does not expand economic opportunity; isolation kills innovation.

The research of economist Richard Florida, has shown over the years that inclusiveness correlates to more venture capital

Inclusiveness correlates to higher wages.

Full participation -- in a society that values diversity -- correlates to more start-ups, more innovation, and better paying jobs.

Here at the Center for American Progress, we see an America whose best days are ahead of us.

We see an inclusive America that is, once again, growing her economy, creating jobs and expanding opportunity.

We see a future with a stronger and growing American middle class.

What we want for our children is a country of more opportunity, not a country of less.

What was true for our parents and grandparents is still true for us -- we are all in this together, and -- economically -- we all do better when we are all doing better.
Just this week, the Chamber of Commerce in Indianapolis joined other business groups to oppose a ban on civil unions for same-sex couples. They did this because of how the law would affect Indiana's "competitiveness on a national and global level."

Likewise, States that pursue nativist, "Know Nothing" policies openly hostile to new Americans and immigration reform are also limiting their economic potential and slowing their ability to create the better paying jobs of the future.

In Arizona, extreme immigration enforcement laws led to a $253 million hit to the tourism industry. In just a year after the law went into effect, more than 2,700 moms and dads lost their jobs.

These laws do nothing to protect American citizens, but they do make states less attractive for tourism, for trade, and for business expansion.

With the exception of our Native American brothers and sisters, all of our people were once strangers in a strange land. But the dreams we have for our children are purely American.

In Maryland, we passed the DREAM Act, we passed Civil Marriage Equality, and we have made it easier for more people to vote in our elections and to participate in our economy.

Better choices, better results.

Best Days Ahead

Promoting the right to vote, guaranteeing marriage equality, and treating immigrants with respect and dignity…, these things all make Maryland stronger.

Bigotry does not create jobs; division does not expand economic opportunity; isolation kills innovation.

The research of economist Richard Florida, has shown over the years that inclusiveness correlates to more venture capital

Inclusiveness correlates to higher wages.

Full participation -- in a society that values diversity -- correlates to more start-ups, more innovation, and better paying jobs.

Here at the Center for American Progress, we see an America whose best days are ahead of us.

We see an inclusive America that is, once again, growing her economy, creating jobs and expanding opportunity.

We see a future with a stronger and growing American middle class.

What we want for our children is a country of more opportunity, not a country of less.

What was true for our parents and grandparents is still true for us -- we are all in this together, and -- economically -- we all do better when we are all doing better.


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