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Wasserman Schultz Statement on Working Families Flexibility Act

Statement

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

On Monday, more than 150 leading women's, worker, and civil rights organizations from across the country sent a letter to the U.S. House of Representatives stating their opposition to the Working Families Flexibility Act (also known as the "comp time' bill) -- which is slated to be voted on in the House this Wednesday. U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (FL-23) released the following statement:

"Contrary to its name, this bill does not protect working families. Many hourly workers in South Florida depend on the opportunity to collect their hard-earned overtime pay to support their families and make ends meet. This anti-family, anti-worker bill would make it harder for employees to provide for their families and easier for employers to pay less for overtime work with hazy promises of time off later.

"This legislation provides no guarantee that employees would get to use their time off when they need it, or if an employer goes out of business, workers may never get compensated at all. Employees who depend on overtime pay to put food on the table may be forced to compete with fellow employees who are willing to trade their overtime wages for cheaper comp time.

"Women, particularly Hispanic women, are more likely to be hourly wage workers, more likely to be in jobs with higher power differentials between employee and employer, and still represent two-thirds of family caregivers. A worker with a sick child at home gets no benefit from earning comp time if she can't take it when she needs it. Instead, she deserves pay for the overtime hours she's worked, paid sick leave, and a fair and living wage.

"I urge my colleagues to vote against this bill that would empower employers to exploit their employees. We need to come together to discuss policies that make meaningful progress for working families."


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