Repeal of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Floor Speech

By:  Marsha Blackburn
Date: May 16, 2013
Location: Washington, DC


Mrs. BLACKBURN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

You know, it is just absolutely amazing that we are once again here on the floor to repeal ObamaCare, but it is a necessary step that we find that we have to do.

It is so interesting being out in my district. Whether I am talking to State-elected officials or county-elected officials or talking to those who are employers in our district--those who are job creators--repeatedly we hear from them: this is a bill that turned into a law that is too expensive to afford.

One of the reasons--and I would point this out--this is a copy of the law as published. What it has turned into is 13,000 pages of regulation. Indeed, I wanted to bring that tower of red tape here to the floor today. It is seven feet tall and growing. It was too big to be allowed on the House floor.

It is amazing that much regulation that has come from this 2,700-page bill. Now we find out from The Washington Post and The New York Times that Secretary Sebelius had conversations with some companies and organizations asking them to help fund getting this started.

Why is this happening? Three years ago, we were told it would be an $800 billion bill. And guess what? When we went to the Budget Committee this year, $2.6 trillion is the estimated cost of this bill. So insurance--more expensive. It was to save households $2,500 a year, but instead they're already paying $3,000 more. And the survey that Chairman Murphy ran for us in the Energy and Commerce Committee shows that the cost will go anywhere up to about 400 percent, depending on who you are, what group you're in. That's what you're going to see your insurance cost go up to.

We hear from physicians. Harder to get in to see a physician? Yes, it is.

Our goal should be about how do we preserve access to affordable health care for all Americans. Instead, what my friends across the aisle have done is to focus on how do you centralize health care, run up the cost, and decrease access. That is the reason that we are here on the floor today.


Mrs. BLACKBURN. Mr. Speaker, We trust our constituents and the American people. We don't need government control of this. Certainly we don't need the IRS policing our private health care information. There is nothing affordable about the Affordable Care Act, and that is why we are concerned.