Reps. Maloney, King & Van Hollen Introduce Resolution Designating April as Parkinson's Awareness Month

Press Release

By:  Carolyn Maloney Pete King Chris Van Hollen, Jr.
Date: April 11, 2013
Location: Washington, DC

Today, the co-chairs of the Congressional Caucus on Parkinson's Disease Reps. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), Peter King (R-NY), and Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) introduced a resolution designating April as Parkinson's Awareness Month. The resolution calls for continued research to find better treatments, and eventually, a cure for the disease. It also thanks the dedicated national, state, and local organizations, volunteers, researchers, and millions of Americans across the country working to improve the quality of life of persons living with Parkinson's disease and their families.

The Congressional Caucus on Parkinson's Disease was founded in 1999 to increase awareness of the second most common neurological disease in the United States, affecting an estimated 500,000 to 1,500,000 people. The exact cause and progression of the disease remains unknown, with predictions that its prevalence will more than double by 2040.

"Throughout my time in Congress I have advocated for the Parkinson's disease community," said Congresswoman Maloney. "Designating April as Parkinson's Awareness Month provides an opportunity to bring attention to improving the lives of those who suffer or may be diagnosed in the future. The federal government has a crucial role to play in supporting innovative research and I urge continued funding to find treatments and a cure."

"As the second most common neurological condition it is imperative that we maintain not only an awareness of the devastating impact of Parkinson's disease but a commitment to find a cure," Congressman King said.

"Designating April as Parkinson's Awareness Month is an important part of our strategy to focus more attention and resources toward fighting this disease," said Congressman Van Hollen. "This is not the time to slash federal funding for agencies like the National Institutes of Health and close the door on promising research and new discoveries to treat Parkinson's. We must replace the sequester with a balanced plan that protects critical investments in our future."