Isakson, Chambliss Vote on Key Tax Amendments to the Senate Budget Resolution

Statement

By:  Johnny Isakson Saxby Chambliss
Date: March 23, 2013
Location: Washington, DC

U.S. Senators Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., and Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., late Friday night cast votes on amendments to the Budget Resolution, that deal with key tax issues in our country. Specifically, Isakson and Chambliss voted in favor of amendments to permanently repeal the federal death tax and to prevent new energy taxes.

The Budget Resolution, S.Con.Res.8, is a non-binding blueprint that both parties use to try to reiterate their spending priorities for the nation.

Isakson and Chambliss voted in favor of S.Amdt.307, which was introduced by Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and would permanently abolish the federal death tax. It failed to pass by a vote of 46 to 53. (The measure needed 51 votes to pass.)

"I voted to permanently repeal the death tax so that hard-working taxpayers could pass along their savings to their children and grandchildren tax-free. That's good for families and small businesses, and it's good for our economy," said Isakson. "I will continue to do everything I can to see that we repeal the death tax permanently."

"This tax is unnecessary and burdensome to American families, especially those who own small businesses and farms," said Chambliss. "It is unfair to working Americans who have hopes of passing down their life savings to their children and grandchildren, and it must be repealed."

Both senators also supported S.Amdt.261, which was introduced by Sen. Blunt, R-Mo., as a point of order against a carbon tax or a fee on carbon emissions. Preventing such energy tax increases protects Americans from skyrocketing energy prices and job losses. A procedural motion on the amendment failed to pass by a vote of 53 to 46. (The measure needed 60 votes to pass.)

"At a time when unemployment remains high and we are trying to grow our economy, the last thing that families and job creators need are higher energy costs," said Isakson. "New energy taxes would kill jobs and put a greater burden on Americans who are struggling to pay to heat their homes or fuel their cars."

"During a time of record unemployment and a staggering federal deficit, the last thing Americans want is yet another government-imposed obstacle to job growth," said Chambliss. "A carbon tax would raise energy costs for every business in America -- at a cost to the American worker."