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Bishop Introduces Legislation to Build Consensus Around New Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial

Press Release

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Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Citing concerns over the controversial design and escalating funding needs of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial, Public Lands and Environmental Regulation Subcommittee Chairman Rob Bishop (UT-01) today introduced the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Completion Act. This bill seeks to build greater consensus amongst key stakeholders, including the Eisenhower family. Susan Eisenhower, granddaughter of President Eisenhower, delivered testimony before the subcommittee expressing the Eisenhower family's concerns for the current design.

"The Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial will honor one of the greatest leaders in our nation's history and serve as a lasting tribute to his legacy. It is important that we get this project right and presently, there are far too many outstanding concerns including the controversial design and rising costs," said Bishop.

In 1999, Congress established the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission to facilitate the design and development of the official Memorial in Washington, D.C. Since its establishment in 1999, Congress has appropriated more than $60 million to the Commission. Until a specific accounting and current balance of those funds are reviewed, Bishop has requested that future funding be placed on hold.

"We need to reevaluate the current status of the project and find the best way forward toward building greater consensus. This legislation will help address funding concerns and will offer alternative designs for consideration. I am hopeful that these changes will help advance the project toward an outcome upon which all parties can agree," Bishop added.

Bishop's legislation would implement a new design competition and eliminate nearly $100 million in future funding requested by the Commission. The legislation would also provide a three-year extension of the site designation approved by Congress in 2006, which included a seven-year sunset on the site.


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