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Americant Energy and Manufacturing Technical Corrections Act

Floor Speech

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

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Mr. ADERHOLT. I want to thank the gentleman from Kentucky for his time and just take a moment to say how much we appreciate working with him and his staff on this legislation as we've moved forward.

As has been mentioned here, the purpose of this legislation, in many respects, is to make critical technical changes to the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, known as EISA, which will both preserve jobs and create new jobs in several related fields of industry.

I want to speak in particular to section 313 of EISA as it relates to the efficiency standards of walk-in coolers and freezers. The section mandates that cooler and freezer doors must meet a certain R-value as a measurement of their ability to retain temperature and use less energy. The problem here is that R-value is a measurement based primarily on one insulating product in particular--foam--and on how thick that foam actually is. However, requiring a product to meet an R-value prohibits technologies that are just as efficient even though they utilize alternative materials or technologies.

In this case, the technology is even more efficient. Although regulatory statutes many times provide the Department of Energy with a waiver authority, a waiver was not a part of this particular statute. This legislation provides the Department of Energy with the authority to waive the requirement if they determine a product meets or exceeds the desired energy-efficiency goals.

Bureaucratic red tape and Federal regulations can sometimes accidentally keep America's innovators and small businesses from creating jobs. Therefore, the Manufacturing Technical Corrections Act is a commonsense solution which maintains standards and yet corrects a problem which otherwise stifles growth and causes companies to lose jobs. Due to an increase in regulation over the past few years, too many small businesses have had to lay off employees, reduce production, and even shut their doors. This is precisely what happened to an innovative manufacturing company in the district I represent back in Alabama.

The Federal Government's embrace of outdated technology prohibits new and innovative solutions to improve energy efficiency. Without sacrificing the efficiency standards which drove the original bill, my bill here that we're discussing this afternoon merely makes a commonsense update.

Just to be clear, this legislation, H.R. 6582, does not create new standards, but it does make existing standards better for businesses and better for consumers. I can personally attest that this technical corrections bill will directly affect over 100 jobs in the State of Alabama, and potentially many others could be created with this new and innovative technology. The other sections of this bill affect a similar and, in some cases, I'm told, an even greater amount of jobs in other places in the country.

Simply put, this commonsense legislation provides technical corrections which remove barriers to technologies and which untie the hands of companies that manufacture here in the United States of America. This means jobs. And not only by moving this legislation will we be able to create jobs, but we'll be able also to make sure that we continue economic growth in this country.

Therefore, I suggest and urge my colleagues that they support this legislation that's on the floor today.

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