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Public Statements

Walsh Legislation Heads to the President

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Today the House of Representatives passed by unanimous vote legislation Rep. Joe Walsh (Il-08) introduced earlier this year. The No-Hassle Flying Act reduces onerous baggage screening regulations and will improve international travel through Chicago-O'Hare Airport.

"America faces many challenges today -- unemployment is still too high, taxes are set to increase, and small businesses are struggling under the dozens of new regulations that have been passed. And tackling those issues has been my priority in Congress," said Walsh. "But if we can work together in a bipartisan and bicameral fashion on a common-sense bill like this, I have hope that Congress can come together on the big items too."

The No-Hassle Flying Act was introduced by Walsh and the companion legislation considered today was introduced by Senators Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) and Roy Blunt (R-MS). The bill gives the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) the ability to waive baggage screening requirements on passengers originating from pre-cleared airports. The measure passed the Senate last week, and the President is said to support it.

"As I've been saying all year: double-security does not equal double-safety. Passage of our bill will allow TSA agents to focus on high-risk travelers and save the taxpayers money. Washington has already over-burdened Americans and streamlining baggage screening requirements is a promising start to reducing these unnecessary regulations. I'm proud to have been part of the efforts."

Walsh, a Member of the Committee on Homeland Security, worked with a number of industry representatives, the TSA congressional office, and the Senate to pass the bill. It is his first piece of legislation enacted into law.


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