Positive Jobs Growth Continues in November`

Press Release

By:  Eliot Engel
Date: Dec. 7, 2012
Location: Washington, DC

Congressman Eliot Engel (D-NY-17) hailed the 33rd consecutive month of job creation following the U.S. Department of Labor reporting an increase of 146,000 jobs in November. The unemployment rate dropped to the lowest number in four years -- 7.7 percent. In the last four months, over 600,000 jobs have been created, and over five million jobs in the last two years. When President Obama took office, the United States was losing 700,000 jobs per month, with our economy teetering on the brink of collapse.

Rep. Engel said, "The trend of job creation continues, even if the levels are not at the levels we would like to see. If we recall the layoffs of four years ago, I think we can easily say we are in a better place as a nation. Perhaps now that the election is over -- and Mitch McConnell's goal of making President Obama a one-term president has failed -- we can stop injecting politics into job creation and pass a comprehensive jobs bill, either during the current lame duck session or once the 113th Congress convenes.

"Our jobs bill must have ample opportunities for infrastructure improvements. As Hurricane Sandy tragically proved, we need to improve our infrastructure. Not only do we have to repair the damages inflicted this time, but we need to improve the structures in place to withstand the inevitable next devastating storm. Prevention is always cheaper than repairing the damages later.

"We need to reinvest in job training and making school more affordable so people can re-train for 21st century jobs. The economy has changed over the years and our workforce, and our government need to change with it. The U.S. invests 2.4% of its GDP into infrastructure, while Europe invests 5% and China invests 9%. We cannot continue to lag behind if we want to lead in the years to come. President Obama called for $50 billion in infrastructure investment, and Congress should adopt that plan.

"While too many people remain out of work to get too excited over these kind of jobs reports, we can say that things are getting better. With a comprehensive jobs bill, we can make things a whole lot better."