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Sen. Vitter, Rep. Pompeo to Introduce Concurrent Resolution Opposing "Carbon Tax"

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Location: Washington, DC

U.S. Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) and Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-Kan.) today announced that they will be introducing a concurrent resolution in both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives expressing the sense of Congress that a carbon tax is not in the economic interest of the United States. Vitter and Pompeo are actively reaching out to colleagues of both parties to support the resolution.

"There's a lot of talk in Washington about raising taxes, and finding "revenues' in creative ways, to avoid going over the fiscal cliff," Vitter said. "But a carbon tax -- which would force more financial hardship upon family budgets, energy consumers and job seekers -- needs to be completely taken off the table. Our resolution would enshrine that."

"A carbon tax would be disastrous to our nation's economy by driving up energy prices and increasing the cost of everything built in America, as well consumer goods purchased by every American," said Pompeo. "I am proud to join Senator Vitter in introducing this resolution, which is aimed at putting Congress on the record in opposition to this awful idea."

The concurrent resolution states that a carbon tax, which would increase the cost of manufactured goods and harm America's manufacturing sector, is regressive in nature and would unfairly burden those vulnerable individuals and families in the U.S. who are struggling under a stagnating economy.

The resolution comes in response to growing pressure for Congress to consider a carbon tax. At a November 15 press gaggle, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said, "We would never propose a carbon tax, and have no intention of proposing one."

Last week Vitter sent U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner a letter asking for answers on his department's involvement in proposing a "carbon tax." A release of Treasury's emails has been requested under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) by the government watchdog organization, Competitive Enterprise Institute. Treasury has not released them, and asked the organization to pay a large sum for the documents -- which goes against the intent of FOIA law. Vitter is also pressing Geithner for an economic analysis of a "carbon tax."


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