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Public Statements

Issue Position: Education

Issue Position

Location: Unknown

North Carolina legislators must hold their constitutional responsibility to education in high regard. When a traditional K-12 Public School educates a student at an average cost of $10,000 per year, and when education consumes almost 40% of the State Budget ($7.1 billion), it is time to talk about alternative solutions. To provide the privilege of education in the best way possible, North Carolina must begin to reform aspects of education at all levels. As the education system is reexamined and reformed, a great intermediate solution is Charter Schools.

Charter Schools have a bit more freedom than a traditional public school and are therefore able to innovate in order to benefit the citizens they serve.
A Charter School does not operate under as severe a bureaucratic structure as a traditional Public School.

In traditional Public Schools, the General Assembly, the Department of Education, the Department of Public Instruction (DPI), County Commissioners, the County School Boards, Superintendents, Principals, and last Teachers, represent the hierarchy down to the student. This structure lends itself to problems, political interest, corruption, and a maze for students and parents to enact necessary change.

Charter Schools do not share this bureaucratic structure. They exist as a public school, but besides the State's testing curriculum, Charter Schools are more deregulated than a traditional public school and this freedom can result in innovation for the student's gain.

Since Charter Schools are run like a business that provides education, there is greater incentive and motivation for performance.

It is important to understand that Charter Schools create competition. The competitive environment compels the traditional Public Schools to rise to compete. Charter schools do not kill traditional Public Schools, but make them better through competition.

In an effort to promote choice for the parent and encourage competition, I support the idea of an education tax credit.

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