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Schneider Earns League of Conservation Voters Action Fund Endorsement

Press Release

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Date:
Location: Northbrook, IL

Democratic congressional candidate Brad Schneider (IL-10) today earned the endorsement of the League of Conservation Voters (LCV) Action Fund for his commitment to protect the environment and our natural resources. Schneider is running in the 10th District against Republican incumbent Congressman Bob Dold, who earned a poor score of 34% on LCV's National Environmental Scorecard for 2011 -- his first year in office.

Congressman Dold has cemented an anti-environment record in Washington, voting repeatedly to slash funding for the EPA. Congressman Dold consistently sided with the Tea Party to eliminate protections against carbon pollution, air and water pollutants, mercury emissions, airborne gases like sulfur dioxide, and would allow pollutants, like arsenic and mercury, in drinking water to go unregulated. This record is in stark contrast with his Republican predecessor Mark Kirk, who had previously earned the LCV Action Fund's endorsement and lifetime mark of 64% on the National Environmental Scorecard, nearly twice as high as Mr. Dold's.

"I am proud to have the support of the LCV Action Fund, and I share their vision for common-sense policies that protect our climate and our natural resources," said Brad Schneider. "Congressman Dold and the Tea Party are misguided in their assault on proven science and the risks they are willing to take, gambling with environmental and clean water protections, put our family and the future for our children at risk."

"LCV Action Fund is proud to support Brad Schneider's candidacy for Congress. He will be a strong advocate for environmental issues and a powerful voice for the preservation of our climate, our natural resources, and our planet," said Alex Taurel, Legislative Representative at the League of Conservation Voters. "Unfortunately, Mr. Dold has repeatedly voted to roll back vital public health protections for the air we breathe and the water we drink. We need leaders in Congress like Brad Schneider who will take bold action to preserve the planet for our children and grandchildren."

Schneider believes in promoting wildlife conservation, expanding green and renewable energy sources, and offering incentives for companies that reduce carbon pollution. In contrast, Congressman Dold even succumbed to pressure from the Tea Party and slashed funds to help preserve the Great Lakes.

Background:

Low marks from League of Conservation Voters. Dold earned a low mark from the environmental organization League of Conservation Voters for his commitment to protecting natural resources, conservation and other key environmental issues. Dold's score on LCV's National Environmental Scorecard was just 34% for his first year in office. [League of Conservation Voters, accessed 4/12/12]

Voted to slash $250 million from Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. In 2011, Dold voted to cut more than half of the funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, despite promises to protect the Lakes. Crain's Chicago Business attributed this vote in part to "pressure" from Tea Party activists. [Crain's Chicago Business, 3/28/11]

Voted against requiring EPA to control Great Lakes pollution. In 2011, Dold voted against requiring the EPA to "plan and implement a strategy, using existing authority, to control air pollution that could affect the Great Lakes." [CQ Floor Votes, 9/23/11]

Dold voted to preserve billions of dollars of subsidies for oil companies. Dold voted against an amendment that would eliminate up to $53 billion in taxpayer subsidies by closing a royalty payment loophole for oil companies operating offshore. At a time when oil companies are making outsized profits by charging Americans high gas prices at the pump, this amendment would have prevented highly profitable oil companies from drilling for free on publicly owned resources. [House Roll Call Vote 109, 2/18/11]

Dold recklessly voted against strengthening offshore drilling safety standards--even after the BP spill. This amendment would have implemented basic offshore drilling safety reforms recommended by the independent commission tasked with investigating the causes of the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill and recommending oversight reforms. Dold opposed this amendment that would have resulted in common-sense reforms that still have not been codified in law following the greatest environmental disaster in our nation's history. [House Roll Call Vote 301, 5/10/12]

Voted to nullify certain rules regulating emissions for commercial and industrial boilers. The bill would nullify the current rules for commercial and industrial boilers and require the Environmental Protection Agency to write new rules and finalize them within 15 months of the bill becoming law. [CQ Floor Votes, 10/13/11]

Dold voted to nullify rules limiting mercury pollution from cement plants. The bill would nullify Environmental Protection Agency rules for cement plant emissions and require the development of new rules that would not go into effect until 2017. [Washington Post, 10/09/11; CQ Floor Votes, 10/06/11]

Voted to bar the EPA from regulating greenhouse gas. In 2011, Dold voted to prohibit the EPA from addressing climate change by regulating greenhouse gases, to change the definition of air pollutant in the Clean Air Act and to keep states from addressing climate change through the regulation of greenhouse gases. [CQ House Action Report, 4/04/11]

Dold voted to block funding for enforcement of pollution limits from cement plants. In 2011, Dold voted for an amendment to the budget to block funding for the enforcement of limits on mercury and other toxic pollution from cement plants. [Environmental Defense Fund Press Release, 2/18/11]

Dold questioned the science behind climate change. In 2010, Dold's answer in a Q&A session about global warming was paraphrased by the Gurnee Review: "While the science has been put in question, we don't know the man-made impacts." [Gurnee Review, 1/14/10]


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