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Bingaman: New Mexico Awarded Grants to Support Law Enforcement in Santa Fe, Clovis, & McKinley County

Press Release

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman today announced that various communities around New Mexico have been awarded grants through the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to support efforts aimed at reducing and preventing crime.

"These federal grants are helping ensure that New Mexico has the resources to continue to train officers and to make crime fighting a priority," Bingaman said.

Grants were awarded through the DOJ's Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program (JAG), which allows states and units of local government, including tribes, to support a broad range of activities to prevent and control crime based on their own state and local needs and conditions.

The following New Mexico communities were awarded funding:

City of Santa Fe - $45,262 to support law enforcement initiatives, including the purchase of in-car scanners, in-car computers, and a video system and support of the facilitation of the Santa Fe Coordinated Community Response Program.
McKinley County - $31,735 to support law enforcement initiatives, including the purchase of weapon mounted lights, holsters, and K-9 handlers' training. City of
Clovis - $23,717 to purchase law enforcement equipment, including an AFIX Tracker Silver Automated Fingerprint and Palm Print Identification System.
An additional grant was awarded through the DOJ's State Justice Statistics (SJS) Program, which maintains and enhances each state's capacity to address criminal justice issues through collection and analysis of data. The following grant was awarded:

University of New Mexico Contracts and Grants Accounting - $64,600 to the New Mexico Statistical Analysis Center (NMSAC) to continue the collection of data for the Arrest-Related Deaths program and to provide the information to the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) annually. The NMSAC also plans to pilot New Mexico's first statewide victimization survey.


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