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Public Statements

Rep. Roybal-Allard Condemns Supreme Court Decision Upholding "Show Me Your Papers" of AZ Immigration Law

Statement

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Today Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard denounced the Supreme Court's decision to uphold a section of Arizona's draconian anti-immigrant law, SB 1070, that requires state and local police to determine the immigration status of anyone they detain if a "reasonable suspicion" exists that the person may be undocumented. Fortunately, the justices otherwise reaffirmed that immigration enforcement should remain the exclusive purview of the federal government.

"While I am pleased that the Supreme Court has wisely decided to strike down several of the most egregious portions of SB 1070," said Rep. Roybal-Allard," I am deeply concerned that the law's infamous "show me your papers" provision will remain intact. This is clearly an affront to the American ideal of equal justice under the law because it potentially opens the door to the rampant profiling of U.S. citizens and legal residents.

Thankfully, in striking down three other key elements of SB 1070, the justices have once again reaffirmed the primacy of the federal government in enforcing our immigration laws. Most Americans understand that a patchwork of state laws in the mold of SB 1070 won't get us any closer to solving this national challenge. What we need now more than ever is for the leaders of both parties to work together with President Obama to finally fix our broken immigration system."

The court struck down two provisions making it a state crime for undocumented immigrants to not carry the proper papers or attempt to work in Arizona. They also ruled as unconstitutional a section allowing police officers to arrest someone without a warrant where "probable cause" exists to believe that the individual could be deported under U.S. law.


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