or Login to see your representatives.

Access Candidates' and Representatives' Biographies, Voting Records, Interest Group Ratings, Issue Positions, Public Statements, and Campaign Finances

Simply enter your zip code above to get to all of your candidates and representatives, or enter a name. Then, just click on the person you are interested in, and you can navigate to the categories of information we track for them.

Public Statements

Issue Position: Occupational Licensing

Issue Position

By:
Date:
Location: Unknown

Libertarians believe that the exercise of an occupation or profession is a natural right not subject to regulation or taxation, except insofar as it makes use of public resources. Therefore, Libertarians support the repeal of all statutes licensing occupations or professional practices, and reversion to private certification organizations.

While 'licensing' is promoted as a tool for acting against unscrupulous or incompetent providers of services, in practice it mainly serves to restrict competition and suppress new entrants into a field. Government can properly prosecute for fraud for past abuses, but should not become a gatekeeper that converts a right into a privilege. We see Occupation Licensing as undue and unwarranted restrictions on individuals' rights to work and earn a living in any manner they choose.

1g. Bond Initiatives
Ideally, Libertarians favor a moratorium on any new debt obligations. Moreover, as a measure to protect the taxpayers we support legislation requiring bond issues only be voted at state general elections.

1h. Certificates of Obligation
The Texas Legislature bypassed voter approval for political subdivisions to borrow money by enacting the Certificate of Obligation Act of 1971(Section 274.041 Local Government Code) as local governments viewed bond referendum requirements as "too burdensome." Since that time, many local governmental entities have driven their communities deep into debt with no approval from the voters. Unlike bonds, a Certificate of Obligation simply requires a 30 day public notice of a corresponding ordinance to enact. Should the public oppose the measure, they have 30
days to petition, requiring 10% of all registered voters as a minimum, to prevent the ordinance from being enacted. As such an unfair process is a clear danger to taxpayers and residents of the state, Libertarians support the repeal of the Certificate of Obligation Act of 1971.


Source:
Back to top