Search Form
First, enter a politician or zip code
Now, choose a category

Public Statements

NBC "Meet the Press" - Transcript

Interview

By:
Date:
Location: Unknown

BREAK IN TRANSCRIPT

DAVID GREGORY:
Welcome to both of you.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
Good morning, David.

DAVID GREGORY:

So Governor Patrick, here we are--

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
We're just-- we were just giggling at the setup. We didn't know we were here to face off.

DAVID GREGORY:
Yeah, well, that's it. You're here. Like it or not, you're facing off. And it is about the economy.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
We'll attack you, David.

DAVID GREGORY:
Well, that's always an option. Let's look at the record here. Because we're look at the economic record of President Obama. And here's the jobless rate as you go back to when he came into office. Up and down we go.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
Right.

DAVID GREGORY:
And now it's going back up in terms of the unemployment rate.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
Right.

DAVID GREGORY:
8.2% for May. His perhaps the most daunting chart, if you look at three straight months, where we've seen this decline in job creation. In February, it was looking better. Then you see March, April, and May.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
Right.

DAVID GREGORY:
Not very many jobs being created. Governor Patrick, is the president, because of the economy, the underdog again?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:

Isn't it funny that we talk about the economy in political terms, or about the unemployment rate in political terms first, without talking about the impact on working people and families and the communities they live in? Job gains are always good news. 27 straight months of job gains is great news. But we're never going to have the rate of job gains that we need until the Congress passes the jobs bills that the President's put before them.

DAVID GREGORY:
And we know that that's the silver bullet how?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
But you know, we need to talk about that.

DAVID GREGORY:
Yeah.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
Because it's-- I know from my business experience and my government experience that investment is what creates jobs. In Massachusetts, we're investing in education, in innovation, in infrastructure. And that show we moved from 47th in job creation to one of the national leaders today, and why we've turned around an income decline when Governor Romney was in office to an income gain today.

DAVID GREGORY:
Right, you had stimulus, though. Right, Governor Kasich? We had federal stimulus from this president.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
And it helped.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Well, look. I mean the problem we have, David, I would tell you honestly the numbers that just came out, they frighten me because I believe we're going to see, in all probability, some unemployment increases in Ohio. I mean we're down to 7.4% down from 9.1%, which is great. But these job numbers are terrible. And I agree with Deval when he says it's about families. Because I mean if you don't get families to work, you create real moral problems in your country.

DAVID GREGORY:
Right, but we--

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Here's the problem, David.

DAVID GREGORY:
But we understand that it's about families. I mean this is a debate in the campaign about who's got the chops to turn the economy around.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:

Well, that is a problem.

DAVID GREGORY:
That is the political debate.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Look, here's the problem. When you have uncertainty that people face today, when you're talking about higher taxes, when you have this enormous debt, when you over-regulate, people are uncertain. If you're a small business person, you can't deal with uncertainty. So you sit on the sidelines.
If you're a big company, you don't know what you're going to do, you sit on the sidelines. So the talk about higher capital gains, higher income taxes, this enormous debt, highest debt we've ever seen in our history, which leads us to conclude, or business people to conclude, that means higher taxes. You've got an EPA that is overly zealous.

You have Obama Care. No one knows even what the rules are. You have Dodd Frank, no one knows what those rules are. I mean the rules are so thick you could write many encyclopedias with them. Companies see that, and they say, "We're out of here." And this is the problem.
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
--confidence. The governor talked about lack of certainty. Where is the confidence that people have in this president?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
I think John is right, there is a certain amount of uncertainty. And that comes, in part, because the plans that the president keeps putting before the Congress get ignored. Those are plans we know work. The business community is expecting higher taxes because they understand that that is part of the solution to dealing with the deficit.

Every economist understands that, as well. But we can't get the Congress to act. And that's a problem. What we have right now is a Congress which has decided that there is a political advantage in stymieing this president, putting ideology ahead of country. And that is what this election is about, and what has to be rejected.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
David, in 1997, I was the architect, one of the chief architects, of the balanced budget. We didn't raise taxes. In fact, we cut capital gains. We also balanced our budget, paid down the largest amount of debt in history. And, you know, we were running huge surpluses. And, you know, raising taxes, that's not the problem with Congress.

Frankly, this whole city is dysfunctional, you know. And the executive is not leading. You can't-- it's like blame. I'm an executive in Ohio. I can't blame the legislature for things not getting done. I have to accept responsibility.
And you know what? I've led. And I've worked well with the legislature. And we've gone from 48th in the country in job creation to number six. We've created over 70,000 jobs. You have to lead. And frankly, here's where I think the problem is, Deval, you being a businessman. I don't think they know what they want to do.

Some temporary jobs bill, that was what stimulus was. It didn't work. The idea that we're going to have a temporary tax cut, that doesn't provide any certainty. You know what they need to do? They need to say, "We're not going to raise taxes. We might close some loopholes. We should bring down the rates. We're not going to kill investment. We're going to streamline our regulations. And we're going to have certainty."

DAVID GREGORY:
All right, so part of--

(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
But part of the debate here, part of the debate is who's got the skills to turn the economy around?

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
That's correct.

DAVID GREGORY:
Now you're saying the Congress has got to do its job. You're not really talking about the president's record, the positive or the negative. You've also been dispatched this week to go after Romney's record in Massachusetts. He came out of a tough economic environment. The unemployment rate dropped while he was governor. But he was 47th in the country--

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
That's right.

DAVID GREGORY:
--in job creation.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:

Right.

DAVID GREGORY:
Not good enough, in your view.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
That's right. Well, that's not good enough. And frankly, you know, no executive in government can do their job without the partnership of a legislature. That's been true in Massachusetts, that's been true in Ohio. The president needs that partnership here. The president has bucked the trend. He's turned job losses into job gains. That's important.

No one, including the president, believes that these job gains are coming fast enough. But it's clear that he has bucked the trend, and it's succinct (?) from Governor Romney, who rode the trend, in fact, trailed the trend when he was governor of Massachusetts. Doesn't mean he was a failure as governor. But the fact is that we had a stronger economy then. We were out of recession when he came to power. And he trailed the country in job creation.

DAVID GREGORY:
But help me understand the logic here.

(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
Can I just-- help me understand the logic here. There was a recession. Massachusetts came out of that with rather anemic job creation. But the unemployment rate did fall. You say that that's a failed economic record. You're saying, in President Obama's case, that that's his calling card, that that's a success.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
I'm saying that--

DAVID GREGORY:
Does that make sense to you?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
--that, in point of fact, when Governor Romney was governor of Massachusetts, incomes were declining in Massachusetts while they were increasing across the country. That we were behind 47 or 46 other states in Massachusetts in job creation at a time when the economy was--
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
--you look at this.
(OVERTALK)

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
--just to finish.

DAVID GREGORY:
Go ahead.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
And the difference is that Governor Romney was following a trend of relatively good economic conditions in the country at a time very different from now, where President Obama has turned that trend, has bucked that trend, and we're getting job creation, where we're getting job losses.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Let me, first of all, he wasn't 47. When he took over, he was 51st, counting DC. When he left, he was 30th in the country. He created tens of thousands of jobs and the unemployment went down. But here's what I find really interesting.

You have a president, he opens up with Bain Capital, attacking on that. Now they're trying to attack Romney. Let me ask you a question. What is the president for? I mean unemployment has gone up. We have a half a million Americans lost their jobs, the largest debt. The politics is terrible.
When I started in Ohio, it was terrible. You know what? We're now getting bipartisan support for our bills. And that's called leadership. And I don't dislike the president. You know, I've been with him, I like him. But I don't understand what their plan is. So when you don't have a very good record, you know what you do in politics? You attack your opponent and try to shift the blame. What the president needs to do is come out and say, "How are we going to repair this economy? Stop blaming Congress." Remember, he was the guy was going to unite the country. And--
(OVERTALK)

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
--class war for everything--
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
Well, but that's rhetoric.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
But--

DAVID GREGORY:
Do you think Congress has a role to play now?

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Of course they do.

DAVID GREGORY:
Well, what is the role that they can play to stimulate the economy now? If we're heading toward a spring/summer slump, what can government do? You believe in--
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:

--government intervention in Ohio.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Well--

DAVID GREGORY:
If I was a Congressman-- you're doing it.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
David, look. The town's dysfunctional. Okay, it's dysfunctional. And without leadership from the top, you know, what they really need to do is, the president and Harry Reid and John Boehner need to put the country first. I mean they got very close, I think, to being able to reach an agreement. If they had just agreed on--
(OVERTALK)

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
I think that's true.
(OVERTALK)

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
If they had closed loopholes, and had they lowered rates, instead of talking about class warfare and, you know, the top 1%, that's just nonsense stuff. Class warfare has never worked in American politics. It didn't work with McGovern. It didn't work for Gore. Stop demonizing and separating--
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
--accountability?

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Of course they do. I mean you think I'm happy with the fact that I left Washington and the Republicans that controlled everything blew the budget up? No.

DAVID GREGORY:
All right.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Look, I mean but the fact of the matter is, David, I hate to tell you this, I'm not voting for anybody for president who has never been an executive. In business and in government, you have to be an executive. You don't run a company from the board of directors. You don't run a government from the legislature. It is up to the president to lead. He's not led effectively.

DAVID GREGORY:

Governor Patrick?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
I want to agree, David, with some of what John says, except, obviously, the last part. But the point about needing the Congress to do its role. When John was head of the budget committee, he worked with a Democratic president, and they got good stuff done.

DAVID GREGORY:
Right.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
And it was important. That's fluorotic politics we have in Massachusetts, excuse me, in the capital today. It's not about a blame grain (SIC), that's a fact. And everyone has to take some responsibility for that, including--
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
All right, but let me ask. I want to pick up on this point. Okay, Governor Kasich says he wants somebody who's got that business background, who's run something.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
An executive.

DAVID GREGORY:
An executive.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:

Even a governor like--
(OVERTALK)

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
--Patrick for president.
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
Now here was an important moment this week. Not just the jobs report. But the former president of the United States, Bill Clinton, in an interview, taking exception, as you did, as Cory Booker did on this program, as Ed Rendell and others did with the Obama campaign, attacking the Bain record of Governor Romney. This is what President Clinton said.

(videotape)

FORMER PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON:

I don't think that we ought to get in the position where we say this is bad work. This is good work. //
There's no question that in terms of getting up and going to the office and you know, basically performing the essential functions of the office. A man who has been governor and had a sterling business career crosses the qualification threshold.
(end videotape)

DAVID GREGORY:
Sterling business career, he was talking about Governor Romney. It seems to undercut one of the big arguments that the president has against Romney, does it not?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
It undercuts the spin on the argument that the president has made. The president has never attacked Bain. It's not about Bain. It's never been. Bain's a fine company. And--
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
You're telling me the president agrees--

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
I--

DAVID GREGORY:
--that Governor Romney has a sterling business career?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
Private equity has a role in the economy. But Governor Romney's experience in creating jobs in the private and the public sector is fair game.

DAVID GREGORY:
That's not the issue, governor.
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
--sterling business career that he brings to the task of turning the economy around--

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
He had--

DAVID GREGORY:
--in your judgment.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
He had a terrific career creating wealth. There is very little evidence that, either in the public or the private sector, he's had a terrific career creating jobs.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Let me tell you this, David. In Ohio, we faced a huge deficit. We balanced the budget, we cut taxes, we streamlined regulation. And we're up over 70,000 jobs.

DAVID GREGORY:
Uh-huh.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Why am I for Romney? I am for Mitt Romney because I'm working with the wind in my face. These unemployment numbers, this job growth number, 69,000, out of 300 million Americans? It means the wind is stronger in my face in Ohio. You know what Romney will do? He'll fight to balance the budget. Can't do it overnight. He'll cut taxes. He'll provide certainty. He'll streamline regulations. And that's what I need in Ohio.

DAVID GREGORY:
But you mention Ohio, you mention the strength in Ohio. I want to put some figures up on the screen--

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Sure.

DAVID GREGORY:

--about (UNINTEL) states, unemployment numbers then and now.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Yeah.

DAVID GREGORY:
And then let's talk about Ohio. In Ohio, in the third quarter, the last three months, of 2010, you were at 9.8%. You see Florida, Nevada, Colorado, Virginia. Look at the numbers now. As you pointed out earlier in the program, you're at 7.4% in Ohio. Florida's down, Nevada, Colorado, and Virginia. What you didn't mention, and what the president would, is that the auto bailout, particularly in the northeastern part of your state, created jobs. Not just in that sector, but in sectors--

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
David.

DAVID GREGORY:
--that rely upon it.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
David.

DAVID GREGORY:
Is there not some credit--

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
David.

DAVID GREGORY:
--to the president there?

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
David, look. I mean the fact is, we're thrilled with the auto jobs. I'm glad the auto industry has been--
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
Mitt Romney would not have bailed them out.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
But--
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
Mitt Romney would not have bailed them out.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
I'm not here to debate--

DAVID GREGORY:
No, but that's a fact, is it not, governor?

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Well--

DAVID GREGORY:
You said what turned Ohio around was several things. You did not mention the auto bailout.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
But wait a minute, first of all--

DAVID GREGORY:
The president would, would he not?

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Let me tell you, we are thrilled with the auto industry. But giving the facts: 73,000 jobs created, okay, in the last, since '11. Do you know how many direct jobs in the auto industry? 1,800. You know what our biggest areas of job growth is right now? Business and financial services and medical.
See, what we've done in Ohio is we've diversified the economy so that we have multiple ways to grow jobs. I am really happy that the auto industry's strong. I'm happy with the suppliers. It's great. But you can't say that Ohio's doing that great just because of that, because when you look at the other states in the Midwest, they're not performing like we are. We're now the number one job creator in the Midwest.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
David--

GOV. JOHN KASICH:

And it's because of the diversity and a stable environment where businesses can feel they can invest in the state of Ohio.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
May I say? We've had a similar turnaround in Massachusetts in the last six years, following Mitt Romney. We followed very similar strategies as John has followed in Ohio. The reason I'm supporting the president is because that partnership with the federal government has been enormously important to us, as well.

It's not a substitute for the private sector and for private job growth, by no means. But government has a role to play. And investing in our infrastructure, investing in education, is a key role for government. It's something we believe in, in Massachusetts, something the president believes in nationally.

DAVID GREGORY:
But it is interesting. You have not once, in the course of this interview, come out definitively for the President's economic record. Your main point has been to blame Congress. Can the president win reelection if he does not persuade--

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
First of all--

DAVID GREGORY:
-Ohioans and others that his economic record is something that they should build on and vote for him again?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
First of all, they should vote for him because of his economic record, because it's extraordinarily strong. When you consider what this president has been dealing with, the headwinds that he has faced, just like John and me, and that he's turned around, quarter million jobs lost month after month after month in his first, when he first comes into office, and turn that around to job gains, that's incredibly important.

What will accelerate that, and what we all believe will accelerate that, is the plan he has put before the Congress. And he has to have those tools. When he hasn't needed tools, when he's been able to act on his own, great things have happened. And the auto bailout is a prime example of that. That's been good for Ohio and for the whole industry.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
You know what? I really like him. The middle of a tornado in Ohio, he calls me out in the blue, okay, and says, "Is there anything I can do to help?" He's a fine man. We need more guys like this. But when we talk about the record of the president, this is just a fact, unemployment has gone up since he's been in office. A half a million people have lost their jobs.

How do you say that's a good economic record? And the fact is, we still have uncertainty. We don't know what the heck is going to happen tomorrow. They do not have a good economic plan. And I'll tell you why. They don't have the experience as executives over time to understand how to make it work.

(OVERTALK)

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
--the strange thing is to criticize the president for not doing enough, from people who don't think government should do anything at all.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Well, that's not where I-- that's not where I--

(OVERTALK)

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
David, we've got-- I know that's not where you come from.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Yeah.

(OVERTALK)

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
But that has been a lot of the rhetoric in the national (INAUDIBLE).

DAVID GREGORY:
Let me do a couple of quick things before we go. On our trend tracker of top stories this morning on the web, number two on that list is the Wisconsin governor recall. This is happening Tuesday, Governor Kasich. You're, no doubt, watching this as a Republican, as somebody who took on collective bargaining unsuccessfully in your state. Walker may prevail here. What's the larger political impact, do you think?

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Well, I think the public is recognizing that some of the benefits are out of line. Deval's had to deal with it in his state. You know, we didn't get our referendum, but we've reached agreement with all of our state workers. And you're beginning to see local governments reign in some of these costs.
I think it's a matter of balance between those in the public sector and those who pay the bills. And I think Walker's probably going to win. I mean but it's really amazing, he's done a fantastic job, and I think he's going to win this.

DAVID GREGORY:
In your state, Elizabeth Warren running for the Senate. She's concerned about this issue of her ethnic background being a distraction in the race. You have endorsed her.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
I have.

DAVID GREGORY:

How has she handled this, poorly, in your judgment? Will it hurt her?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
You know, I'm-- I've-- I've only run for two-- for one office two times. So I'm an amateur for that kind of thing. But I'll tell you I think she's a terrific candidate. She's going to win. She's got a fantastic grassroots organization, which is absolutely key, both philosophically and politically. She's got a strong case to make. And at home, folks aren't focused on her ethnic background, they're focused on whether she can be a real partner for us--

(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
And they're focused on basketball. So we know you're for the Celtics.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
He was-- you know what? If he was really a great governor, the Celtics would beat the Heat.

DAVID GREGORY:
Well, that's what--

(OVERTALK)

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
Everybody in Ohio is rooting against the Heat.

DAVID GREGORY:
That's it, you hold a grudge.
(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
You don't root for LeBron, and you hold a grudge.

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
(UNINTEL) does not deliver. I believe in forgiveness.

(OVERTALK)

GOV. JOHN KASICH:
--deliver the Celtics, he's going to be a failed governor.

(OVERTALK)

DAVID GREGORY:
We're going to leave it there. The political debate continues. Thank you both very much.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
Good to be with you.

DAVID GREGORY:
Appreciate it.

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK:
Thank you.

BREAK IN TRANSCRIPT


Source:
Skip to top
Back to top