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Public Statements

Energy Department Makes $500,000 Available to Test Wave Energy Device In Hawaii

Statement

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

U.S. Department of Energy will make $500,000 available in Hawaii to test the technical readiness of technologies that can harness energy from waves to supply clean, renewable power to highly-populated coastal regions, U.S. Senator Daniel K. Akaka, U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Representative Mazie K. Hirono, and U.S. Representative Colleen Hanabusa announced today.

The funding will come from the U.S. Department of Energy for a pilot project to deploy and test a wave energy conversion device for one year at the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site in Kaneohe Bay. This funding will help develop wave power technologies that could draw on the country's significant ocean energy resources, create new industries and new jobs in America, and secure U.S. leadership in the global race for clean energy technologies.

"It is in our nation's and state's best interest to advance marine energy technologies, and I am so pleased that U.S. Departments of Energy and Defense are collaborating to help us harness wave energy," said Senator Akaka, author of the act that established the Department of Energy's marine and hydrokinetic research and development program. "Wave energy has great potential to be a significant source of power, and it is wise to make it part of America's energy future. This funding will help lay the groundwork for future wave energy projects that will support our local economy and keep our environment clean for our keiki."

"In Hawaii, we have a real opportunity to meet the vast majority of our energy needs by relying on natural, clean, renewable sources. As an island state located in the middle of the Pacific ocean, we can experiment with a wide variety of wave, wind, solar and geothermal energy that could one day help diminish our dependence on imported oil. We owe it to our community to explore new methods for generating power from resources available in Hawaii. I am very pleased that the administration recognizes that Hawaii serves as a job creating test bed for green energy development and continues to invest in the work being done here," said Senator Inouye.

"This opportunity allows Hawaii's entrepreneurs to compete for the resources to help grow Hawaii's clean energy industry. Successfully developing the wave energy of the Pacific Ocean would be a significant step toward helping our island state become energy self-sufficient," said Congresswoman Hirono, who recently released an energy sustainability plan based on input from renewable energy leaders statewide. "This is the kind of investment that will not only strengthen our research efforts in this field, but will also create green jobs for Hawaii."
U.S. Department of Energy will make $500,000 available in Hawaii to test the technical readiness of technologies that can harness energy from waves to supply clean, renewable power to highly-populated coastal regions, U.S. Senator Daniel K. Akaka, U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Representative Mazie K. Hirono, and U.S. Representative Colleen Hanabusa announced today.

The funding will come from the U.S. Department of Energy for a pilot project to deploy and test a wave energy conversion device for one year at the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site in Kaneohe Bay. This funding will help develop wave power technologies that could draw on the country's significant ocean energy resources, create new industries and new jobs in America, and secure U.S. leadership in the global race for clean energy technologies.

"It is in our nation's and state's best interest to advance marine energy technologies, and I am so pleased that U.S. Departments of Energy and Defense are collaborating to help us harness wave energy," said Senator Akaka, author of the act that established the Department of Energy's marine and hydrokinetic research and development program. "Wave energy has great potential to be a significant source of power, and it is wise to make it part of America's energy future. This funding will help lay the groundwork for future wave energy projects that will support our local economy and keep our environment clean for our keiki."

"In Hawaii, we have a real opportunity to meet the vast majority of our energy needs by relying on natural, clean, renewable sources. As an island state located in the middle of the Pacific ocean, we can experiment with a wide variety of wave, wind, solar and geothermal energy that could one day help diminish our dependence on imported oil. We owe it to our community to explore new methods for generating power from resources available in Hawaii. I am very pleased that the administration recognizes that Hawaii serves as a job creating test bed for green energy development and continues to invest in the work being done here," said Senator Inouye.

"This opportunity allows Hawaii's entrepreneurs to compete for the resources to help grow Hawaii's clean energy industry. Successfully developing the wave energy of the Pacific Ocean would be a significant step toward helping our island state become energy self-sufficient," said Congresswoman Hirono, who recently released an energy sustainability plan based on input from renewable energy leaders statewide. "This is the kind of investment that will not only strengthen our research efforts in this field, but will also create green jobs for Hawaii."

"Hawaii's unique access to the elements -- wave, solar, wind, geothermal -- make our state the ideal laboratory for research and development of clean, renewable energy. I am glad to see the Energy Department is continuing to work with the Navy in exploring alternative energy solutions to serve the needs of our military, and ultimately the needs of our nation. The Navy and Marine Corps have set an ambitious goal of producing fifty percent of their power from alternative sources by 2020, so it is important that they show a willingness to explore the possibilities of wave energy," said Congresswoman Hanabusa, a member of the House Armed Services Committee and the Committee on Natural Resources.

The Energy Department estimates that there are over 1,170 terawatt hours per year of electric generation available from wave energy off U.S. coasts, although not all of this resource potential can realistically be developed. For comparison, the United States uses 4,000 terawatt hours of electricity each year.

The Energy Department expects to select a proposed wave energy device that is substantially complete and ready for testing and data collection without significant modification. The testing will be accompanied by a comprehensive performance assessment, including analysis and review of all deployment, operations, maintenance, and related activities. This project will advance our understanding of innovative technologies and identify areas of performance improvement that will benefit this emerging industry as a whole.
"Hawaii's unique access to the elements -- wave, solar, wind, geothermal -- make our state the ideal laboratory for research and development of clean, renewable energy. I am glad to see the Energy Department is continuing to work with the Navy in exploring alternative energy solutions to serve the needs of our military, and ultimately the needs of our nation. The Navy and Marine Corps have set an ambitious goal of producing fifty percent of their power from alternative sources by 2020, so it is important that they show a willingness to explore the possibilities of wave energy," said Congresswoman Hanabusa, a member of the House Armed Services Committee and the Committee on Natural Resources.

The Energy Department estimates that there are over 1,170 terawatt hours per year of electric generation available from wave energy off U.S. coasts, although not all of this resource potential can realistically be developed. For comparison, the United States uses 4,000 terawatt hours of electricity each year.

The Energy Department expects to select a proposed wave energy device that is substantially complete and ready for testing and data collection without significant modification. The testing will be accompanied by a comprehensive performance assessment, including analysis and review of all deployment, operations, maintenance, and related activities. This project will advance our understanding of innovative technologies and identify areas of performance improvement that will benefit this emerging industry as a whole.


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