Search Form
Now choose a category »

Public Statements

A Day of Prayer

Statement

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Hello, this is your Congressman, Michael Burgess. In the faith of many of our founding fathers, public prayer and national days of prayer had a long-standing and significant history in America. Not a requirement, but a freedom to pray.
Prayer has always been used in this country for guidance. It's been used for protection and used for strength - even before we were a nation, when we were just a handful of colonies. The National Day of Prayer is part of our national history. The first call to prayer was 1775. The Continental Congress asked the colonies to pray for wisdom in forming a nation. President Lincoln's 1863 proclamation called for "a day of humiliation, fasting, and prayer."

As American troops stormed the beaches at Normandy, President Franklin Roosevelt called for our nation to unite in prayer. He also offered a prayer that each citizen be prepared for the road ahead: To let our hearts be stout for waiting-out the troubles and to bear the sorrows that may come. President Roosevelt asked the country to pray and have courage, and to pass that courage on to its American sons in uniform.

Our nation again faces battlefields. Many of those are symbolic compared with the life-threatening nature of wars -- but these battlefields are no less threatening to American liberty.

The National Day of Prayer belongs to all Americans. It is a day that transcends differences, bringing together citizens from all backgrounds. Prayer has been described as the bridge between Heaven and Earth. Today is such a day.
Thank you for taking the time to listen. Please visit my website, burgess.house.gov, for subjects of interest. May God bless you and your family, and as always, may God bless Texas.


Source:
Skip to top
Back to top