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Public Statements

Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act

Floor Speech

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

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Mr. NUNES. Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of this bill.

The bill before us today is targeted towards a very specific and growing threat to our Nation. Every day, American businesses are being targeted by China, Russia, and other foreign actors for cyber-exploitation and theft. These acts of industrial espionage are causing enormous losses of valuable American intellectual property that ultimately costs the United States jobs. We cannot afford to allow high-paying jobs to be stolen in this manner, nor can we simply sit by and allow the cyberwarfare being conducted against us to continue without consequences.

Madam Chairman, jobs are at stake, as is the technological capital of the United States. But if the reality of this economic cyberwarfare isn't convincing enough, you should understand that there are other good reasons for us to support this bill.

The state-of-the-art technology stolen from Americans can easily be turned against us and represents a serious threat to America's critical infrastructure. None in this body would likely disagree that we have to prevent our enemies from protecting American military technology. That's why we have long had export controls and other mechanisms to prevent such a thing from occurring. Madam Chairman, how is the theft of intellectual property any less a threat today?

Whether we like it or not, cyberwarfare is a reality. Our government and its security agencies understand this and are using both classified and unclassified information to fight the threat. But without passage of this bill, they are being forced to do so without the meaningful participation of industries--private industries--that are being subjected to attacks, that in some cases our government even knows about but cannot share that with those private companies.

So we shouldn't expect America's private sector innovators to protect themselves if we won't tell them where the attacks are coming from. If we don't share this information or allow them to share information with us, how do we expect to secure the sensitive information?

The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.

Mr. ROGERS of Michigan. I yield the gentleman from California an additional 30 seconds.

Mr. NUNES. So we essentially have three choices. We can pass this bill, very narrowly focused, allowing our intelligence community to work with private industry, or we can fund a massive new government program. I think we've proven that those massive new government programs seldom work and are often costly. Or would the opponents of this bill simply rather do nothing and allow our country to continue to be attacked every day?

We need to pass this bill to enable cyberthreat-sharing and provide clear authority for the private sector to defend its networks.

Madam Chair, I want to close by saying that we should congratulate Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member Ruppersberger for the work that they've done to protect this country.

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