Goodlatte Statement on Tax Day

Statement

By:  Bob Goodlatte
Date: April 17, 2012
Location: Washington, DC

Congressman Bob Goodlatte released the following statement on Tax Day:

"All taxpayers are well aware of the frustrations caused by our current tax code. Clocking in at approximately 3.8 million words, the U.S. tax code is extremely complex and difficult to navigate. The King James Bible is only 783,137 words. The U.S. Constitution is 4,447 words. It is clear that we need a simpler and fairer code that will help make America more competitive.

We must force Congress to address tax reform head on. It's time to scrap the code. That's why I have introduced the Tax Code Termination Act. My bill would abolish the Internal Revenue Code by December 31, 2015 and require Congress to approve a new federal tax system by July of the same year.

This legislation would eliminate today's system and allow us, as a nation, to collectively decide what the new tax system should look like. There are many competing alternatives, including the flat tax and the fair tax, but having a set date to end the current tax code will force the issue and the debate to the top of the national agenda.

As many taxpayers rush to file their returns, the Tax Foundation reports that, on average, Americans will work 107 days this year just to pay their taxes. This "Tax Freedom Day" could come even later in the year if taxes continue to rise. The U.S. already has the highest corporate tax rate in the developed world. Tax policies should allow individuals and businesses to keep more of their hard-earned tax dollars, which would encourage investment and provide financial relief for America's small businesses. Our nation's job creators need certainty that they can hire new workers with the confidence that a higher tax bill is not on the way.

Tax reform is long overdue. To achieve economic freedom and stability, we need a tax system that will promote economic growth and the financial independence of individuals. We can encourage investment, savings, and general entrepreneurship if we allow for tax reform that reflects the desire of Americans to be in charge of their own hard-earned money."