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Public Statements

Solutions for Small Businesses

Floor Speech

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

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Mr. WOODALL. Mr. Graves, I appreciate you taking this time tonight.

Folks ask me, What goes on in the evenings there on Capitol Hill? When you finish the votes for the day, what goes on next?

I say, Well, folks are all back in their offices, working, just like small business folks across the country. Just because the customers leave doesn't mean the doors close.

Folks are still working, and this is that time when we get to come down and really fully debate some of these ideas that folks have been watching all day today. We've been talking about transportation policy. We've been talking about Mark Twain a little bit. We've been talking about the rules, the process; but we haven't gotten to talk about small businesses.

When we talk about economic growth in this country--you're from the great State of Georgia, as I am, and we've got some fantastic big companies there. UPS is there, doing fantastic things. They're the folks dressed in brown. Delta Airlines is there, carrying more passengers than anybody else in the country. We've got Coca-Cola there, a brand name that's known the world around. There's Home Depot, the Big Orange, which everybody understands. But that is not where the jobs come from. The jobs come from those small business men and -women who risk everything--everything--to believe that by the sweat of their brows and the power of their ideas they can make their tomorrows better than today.

That letter that you got from your constituent, Mr. Graves, is exactly the kind of letter that I get from folks every single day who say, Rob, I don't mind paying the taxes. I understand part of the social contract is that the government has to run, but it doesn't have to be this painful. We can do it in a better way, in H.R. 25, the Fair Tax, of which you are a proud cosponsor, a huge leader on that bill. It is the single most popularly cosponsored piece of fundamental tax reform legislation in either the U.S. House or the U.S. Senate because voters are demanding it one Member of Congress at a time.

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Mr. WOODALL. That is what is so amazing about small business folks. You never have a small business person come to your office and say, Rob, what I want is a leg up on everybody else. I want an unfair playing field so I can beat all my competition.

That's not who our small business owners are. Our small business owners are people who say, Rob, give me a level playing field, and I will out-compete anybody in any nation around the globe because nobody works harder and has more powerful ideas than does the American worker. Well, that's what the Fair Tax is all about. It says, let's create a level playing field.

My friend is not a freshman as I am. He got here 6 months earlier in a special election that he had to work incredibly hard for; but those of us who are newer to this institution, as you and I are, know there are some folks here who like using the Tax Code to pick winners and losers. I mean, it's an easy thing to do. I look around this body. I can find some examples. I see fluorescent lights here in the Chamber. I could put a huge tax on fluorescent lights so we would never have any more fluorescent lights. I could put a huge tax on plaid shirts so we never have any more plaid shirts. That is what happens with the Tax Code.

The Fair Tax says no. It says we're going to have a single tax rate on everything the consumer buys. You're going to be taxed on everything once--but only once--because those small business men and women who write those letters to your office and to mine say, Rob, I spend more time trying to figure out tax decisions than I do figuring out business decisions. So, when these are the men and women who employ so many of our friends and neighbors, when these are the men and women who create the job growth in this country, we have to have them focus on business decisions, not on tax decisions; and the Fair Tax does that.

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