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Public Statements

Garrett Statement on Second Anniversary of ObamaCare

Statement

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Rep. Scott Garrett (R-NJ) issued the following statement today to mark the two year anniversary of ObamaCare being signed into law:

"Two years ago today, President Obama signed ObamaCare into law, insisting that it would bring down the skyrocketing cost of healthcare while increasing coverage for millions of Americans. As another year has passed, and the American economy has struggled to navigate through a cloud of uncertainty, the failures and costs associated with this unconstitutional law have only become clearer.

"Costs that were supposed to go down with the enactment of ObamaCare have only gone up. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) now projects that spending on healthcare is expected to reach $1.8 trillion in the next decade, and premiums will continue to rise by $2,100 per family. Instead of taking the opportunity to enact meaningful reform with market-based solutions, the Democrats rammed through this bill that brings the heavy hand of government-mandated health insurance down on every family and small business across the country.

"Furthermore, I have long maintained that the individual mandate--the foundation upon which ObamaCare stands--is unconstitutional and represents an egregious assault on our personal liberty. As the Supreme Court begins to hold oral arguments next week, I am confident the Supreme Court will follow suit with rulings in Florida and Virginia to reaffirm the Founders' vision for America and rule ObamaCare unconstitutional."

Garrett has long been an outspoken critic of the federal health care law, particularly the individual mandate. As Chairman of the Constitution Caucus, Garrett re-introduced H.R. 21, the Reclaiming Individual Liberty Act, on the first day of the 112th Congress, which would repeal the individual mandate portion of the federal health care law on the grounds that it is unconstitutional.


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