or Login to see your representatives.

Access Candidates' and Representatives' Biographies, Voting Records, Interest Group Ratings, Issue Positions, Public Statements, and Campaign Finances

Simply enter your zip code above to get to all of your candidates and representatives, or enter a name. Then, just click on the person you are interested in, and you can navigate to the categories of information we track for them.

Public Statements

Letter to Chairman Upton and Chairman Whitfield

Letter

By:
Date:
Location: Unknown

Today Energy and Commerce Committee Ranking Member Henry A. Waxman and Energy and Power Subcommittee Ranking Member Bobby L. Rush sent a letter to Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton and Energy and Power Subcommittee Chairman Ed Whitfield urging them to hold a hearing on the rapid acidifying of oceans due to rising emissions of carbon dioxide. Studies from Columbia University, the University of Bristol, and others concluded that, due to carbon dioxide emissions, ocean acidification is occurring much faster than at any other point in Earth's history, perhaps causing unprecedented marine ecosystem change.

March 21, 2012

The Honorable Fred Upton
Chairman
Energy and Commerce Committee
U.S. House of Representatives
2125 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

The Honorable Ed Whitfield
Chairman
Subcommittee on Energy and Power
U.S. House of Representatives
2125 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Chairman Upton and Chairman Whitfield:

While many are familiar with the scientific evidence that carbon dioxide emissions are responsible for climate change, fewer are aware of carbon dioxide's serious effects on our oceans. We are writing to urge you to hold a hearing on a new scientific study showing that the ocean is acidifying at an unprecedented rate due to rising emissions of carbon dioxide.

The world's oceans serve as sponges to absorb excess carbon dioxide. But when carbon dioxide enters the oceans too quickly, oceans can acidify, damaging sensitive marine ecosystems and species. According to the United Nations Environment Program, ocean acidification is "rapidly becoming a critical issue with the potential, if unabated, to affect many species and their ecosystems, pertinently including those associated with human food resources."[1]

Columbia University, the University of Bristol, and others recently examined the geologic record over the last 300 million years for evidence of significant periods of ocean acidification. The researchers concluded the current rate of ocean acidification is at least ten times faster than at any other point in the Earth's history, including periods that led to major extinctions.[2] Professor Andy Ridgwell from the University of Bristol stated that the study suggests that "the current acidification is potentially unparalleled" and "raises the possibility that we are entering an unknown territory of marine ecosystem change."[3]

These findings underscore one of the potentially serious consequences of failing to act to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide. We urge you to schedule a hearing on this matter as soon as possible.

Sincerely,

Henry A. Waxman
Ranking Member

Bobby L. Rush
Ranking Member
Subcommittee on Energy and Power


Source:
Back to top