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Public Statements

Larson Continues to Call for House to Pass Broad, Bipartisan Transportation Bill

Press Release

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Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Congressman John B. Larson (CT-01) continued his call for House Republican leadership to pass a bipartisan transportation bill that will create construction jobs in Connecticut and throughout the country.

Larson joined Congressman Tim Bishop (NY-01) to introduce the Senate-passed MAP-21 transportation bill, which would provide a two-year extension of transportation funding and create or save 1.8 million American jobs, including over 23,000 in Connecticut.

"At a time when roughly 40 percent of Connecticut's construction workers are unemployed, it's critical for the House to act immediately on this bill," Congressman Larson said. "Transportation funding has always been a bipartisan issue because it's so important for the nation, yet, as we've seen so many times over the last year, Tea Party Republicans have decided to use this critical legislation to try to drive their ideological agenda. I am calling on Speaker Boehner to set partisan politics aside and put the Senate-passed bill up for a vote so that we can continue to move our country forward."

This year, House Republicans proposed a transportation bill that would drastically cut federal funding, causing Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood to call it, "The worst transportation bill I've seen in 30 years." By contrast, the MAP-21 bill passed through the United States Senate by a 74-22 vote earlier this month.

With the current transportation bill extension scheduled to expire at the end of this month, Congress only has four more legislative days to settle this issue.


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