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Public Statements

Snowflakes Embryo Adoption

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC


SNOWFLAKES EMBRYO ADOPTION -- (House of Representatives - September 22, 2004)

(Mr. SMITH of New Jersey asked and was given permission to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.)

Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. Mr. Speaker, less than 5 minutes ago, I was in a room here in the Capitol filled with children who were frozen embryos, several months-even years ago-who went on to be adopted. The stories of these adopted embryos, with names like Kate and Mike, are compelling. We know of at least 60 children who were once cryogenically frozen but have now gone on to be adopted. An adoption program called Snowflakes adoption agency that has been promoting this loving adoption option and underscores why we need to protect these newly created human beings and not steal their stem cells for use in research.

Let me also point out to my colleagues that we often hear the term "spare embryos" in connection with embryonic stem cell research. I hope that we will cease employing that very false term. There is no such thing as a spare embryo. These individuals can be adopted, they are being adopted; and they are just like any other little boy or girl.

We should put our emphasis, and our research dollars, Mr. Speaker, on adult stem cell research and cord blood stem cell research. This research has no ethical downside. And it has worked. That is where the real breakthroughs are occurring each and every day. Heart repair and myriad other advances are occurring not from embryonic, but from adult-and cord blood stem cells.

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