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Public Statements

Letter to Representative Hensarling, Senator Murray, and Members of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction

Letter

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Kansas Congressman Tim Huelskamp signed a letter along with more than 70 of his colleagues urging the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction (the "Super Committee") not to raise taxes.

"The problems facing Washington are the result of its years and years of reckless spending and borrowing," Congressman Huelskamp said. "If the Super Committee were to raise taxes, it would only sustain the underlying problem: Washington spends too much. The Super Committee has a clear choice: they can do the typical Washington thing and refuse to address the overspending problem, or they can propose a real solution that cuts spending without a job-killing tax increase."

"The President himself said that 'you don't raise taxes in a recession.' If the President is truly concerned about getting this economy going again and restoring the American Dream, he will recognize that the only real solution is to cut spending."

The Budget Control Act (P.L. 112-25), passed in August 2011, raised the country's debt limit on the condition that the newly-formed, 12-member Super Committee would come up with recommendations for at least $1.2-$1.5 trillion in cuts. The deadline for the Super Committee to vote on its recommendations is next Wednesday, November 23. The House and Senate are required to vote on the Super Committee's recommendations by December 23, 2011.

The text of the letter is as follows:

Dear Representative Hensarling, Senator Murray, and Members of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction:

It is evident that America has a fiscal crisis because Washington spends too much, not because it taxes too little. According to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, tax revenues will reach or exceed the historical average of 18 percent of economic output by the end of this decade, even as spending continues to increase at an unsustainable rate. Increasing taxes on Americans would destroy jobs, erase all hope of an economic recovery, and simply serve to feed out-of-control spending in Washington.

Thus, as you begin the important task to reach a deficit reduction agreement, we ask that any policies the Joint Select Committee prescribes not increase Americans' tax burden. With current levels of taxation already limiting economic growth, we believe that marginal rates must be maintained or lowered and that repeal of any tax credit or deduction be offset with an equal or greater tax cut.

Although there are diverse beliefs toward specific policies that should be included in any deficit reduction plan, we must recognize that increasing the tax burden on American businesses and citizens, especially during a fragile recovery, is irresponsible and dangerous to the health of the United States.

Sincerely,

MEMBERS OF CONGRESS


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