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Blog: Answering Your Questions Regarding a BBA

Statement

By:
Date:
Location: Unknown

Below is a quick summary of the questions and answers shown in today's video. Thank you all again for submitting some very good questions regarding the BBA, and I look forward to doing this again in the future. -Tim

Q: Mr. Bob Grace, Mr. Bill Cole and Mr. Richard Wilson all asked questions regarding the next steps for the Balanced Budget Amendment upon passing the House.

Answer

* As part of the Budget Control Act, or debt deal, Senator Reid must bring the BBA to the Senate floor for an up-or-down vote by the end of the year.
* The BBA does not go to the President, but rather the states, so the President does not have the opportunity to veto.
* Repealing the Amendment would be the same process as passing it in the first place, with 2/3 majority voting to repeal in the House and Senate as well as ratification by the states. This has only happened once in history -- prohibition.

Q: Mr. Ralph Peyton and Mr. Jim Owens had questions concerning the effects a BBA would have during times of war and natural disasters, as well as whether it would create more gridlock in Washington.

Answer

* A BBA would lead to less gridlock in Washington, because spending would be tied directly to government revenue.
* The BBA contains exceptions for times of war, and any excess spending can only be for the purposes of a military conflict
* 3/5 of Congress can vote to suspend the BBA during times of emergency to provide for emergency funding
* It also creates the environment to lower taxes, as lower taxes provide more opportunity and therefore more taxpayers and federal revenues.

Q: Mr. Thomas Nace had concerns about the budget being balanced on the backs of seniors

Answer:

* While I certainly believe we must reform our entitlement programs to ensure their viability for future generations, I have promised not to change these benefits for existing recipients.
* For those in their thirties and early forties, it is essential we make systematic changes.
* I 100 percent agree the budget should not be balanced on the backs of our seniors, and will vote against any legislation which attempts to do so.

Q: Mr. Alexander Holland and Ms. Cathy Anthony wondered about the BBA's overall role in improving our country's fiscal situation.

Answer:

* It is true the BBA does not reform our tax code, and it does not improve the environment for job creation on its own.
* What it does is provide some certainty for our job creators, who fear runaway government spending will lead to tax increases that hurt their ability to do business.
* Given the chance to make it more difficult for Washington to spend money, not to do so would be a huge mistake.


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