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Public Statements

Griffin: EPA's Boiler MACT Rules Would Risk 5,400 Arkansas Jobs

Press Release

By:
Date:
Location: Little Rock, AR

Congressman Tim Griffin (AR-02) issued the following statement after House passage of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Relief Act (H.R. 2250) earlier today. H.R. 2250 addresses widespread concerns regarding the EPA's proposed rules for boilers, process heaters, and incinerators -- known as Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT):

"At a time when the unemployment rate remains alarmingly high, the Administration seems determined to impose overly burdensome regulations at the expense of Arkansas jobs. It's estimated that the EPA's Boiler MACT rules, as written, could cost Arkansas's economy over $338 million and put more than 5,400 Arkansans out of work. That is why I voted for the EPA Regulatory Relief Act, which puts the brakes on EPA implementation of these new regulations."

The EPA's new Boiler MACT rules require boiler owners such as hospitals, factories, universities, farms, and thousands of major American employers to comply with complex control standards. A recent study by IHS Global Insight estimates that, nationally, compliance costs would be over $14 billion and put more than 230,000 U.S. jobs at risk. Another study by the American Forest and Paper Association estimates that the Boiler MACT rules would cost U.S. pulp and paper mills over 20,000 jobs, or 18% of the entire forest products sector workforce.

The EPA Regulatory Relief Act directs the EPA to propose revised rules within 15 months and delays implementation of any new standards for at least five years so that they do not destroy jobs. It is supported by hundreds of organizations, trade associations, labor unions, and job creators across the country.


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