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Public Statements

Transparency in Regulatory Analysis of Impacts on the Nation Act of 2011

Floor Speech

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Mr. FARENTHOLD. I rise today in support of the TRAIN Act.

Despite what my friends and colleagues across the aisle say, we are not out to poison America. My children, my wife, I breathe the air and drink the water in this country.

What we are asking for is to look at regulations with a scientific analysis and not an emotional analysis. Do what every business in this country does. Do what every family in this country does when they are faced with tough decisions or any decision.

When I go to the grocery store, I have the option of buying ramen noodles or lobster, and I usually settle somewhere in the middle on chicken. Businesses look at the cost and benefit of everything that they do just like families do.

What we are asking through the TRAIN Act is to take a look at what these oppressive regulations cost. We've got great regulations in place now. We've improved the air immensely. Let's see if it's worth going the next step.

We can factor in all of the things that our friends on the other side of the aisle want, but we need to do the study, and we need to have the information so we can make informed decisions.

The money that these excessive regulations cost businesses are passed on to the consumer. American families are asked all the time to make sacrifices to make ends meet.

As these regulations run up energy costs, our families' electric bills and gasoline bills go up, and they have to make decisions about whether they're going to fill their car with gas or what kind of food they're going to buy, if any, to put on their tables.

We have got to keep people working. If these regulations put people out of work, the families that the wage owners support suffer too. They don't have the money to pay their bills. They don't have the money to buy food. They don't have the money to buy medicine. We have got to be as intelligent as we are compassionate.

The intelligent thing to do is to do a cost-benefit analysis of what regulations do. That's what we are asking in the TRAIN Act. Let's use our brains.


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