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Woodall Issues Statement on Short-Term Continuing Resolution

Statement

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Date:
Location: Washington, DC

On Monday, February 28, 2011, Congressman Rob Woodall (R-GA-7) issued the following statement on H.J. Res. 44, the short-term Continuing Resolution being considered on the House Floor on Tuesday, March 1:

"Last week, Americans watched democracy in action as the House of Representatives brought H.R. 1, the bill to fund the government running through the end of the fiscal year,to the Floor for open debate and passage. H.R. 1 contains billions of dollars in cuts and begins to curtail the out-of-control spending of the past. The bill now waits in the Senate for consideration. If Senate Majority Leader Reid refuses to bring H.R. 1 to a vote, then the House must pass a short-term Continuing Resolution to prevent government funding on March 5."

"We must face our financial problems head-on--the American people understand this, and it is time that President Obama and Senator Reid understand this as well. The House has passed legislation reflecting the will of the American people. The Senate has an obligation to consider what the House sends before it, especially at such a crucial time in our nation's history."

Woodall was one of forty-seven Members of Congress to vote for every single proposed amendment to H.R. 1, which further reduces non-security spending.

"I made a promise to my constituents that I would do everything in my power to rein in the federal government's spending spree," Woodall said. "H.J. Res. 44 includes $4 billion in spending reductions--that's $2 billion per week. I will stand with my fellow colleagues in the House by continuing this "per week' funding structure as long as Senator Reid refuses to move H.R. 1 through the Senate."

"I am pleased with the content of this short-term Continuing Resolution as it upholds our promise to the American people: to hold our government accountable, to keep our government running and to cut excessive spending."


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