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Public Statements

Czars Defunded; Greenhouse Gas, Cement Rules Blocked

Press Release

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Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Congressman John Carter chalked up three legislative wins this week in floor action on the FY 2011 Continuing Resolution, defunding the Obama Administration's "Czars", and the EPA's attempts to implement new job-killing regulations on greenhouse gases and Portland cement.

Carter joined forces with Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA) to defund the "Czars" appointed by President Barack Obama without Senate confirmation. Carter and Scalise both introduced resolutions on the topic, and the two legislators agreed to jointly push Amendment 204. The bipartisan measure passed 249-197, with the support of 236 Republicans and 13 Democrats.

EPA red-tape was dealt a blow when Carter's Amendment 165 blocking proposed new rules against the Portland cement industry passed 250-177, with 231 Republicans and 19 Democrats in support. If enacted the new regulations are expected to result in the closure of 18 of America's 97 Portland cement factories, the loss of 1800 jobs, and an increase in global air pollution as cement production moves to China and India where there are no environmental controls.

Carter also joined fellow Texans Congressmen Joe Barton and Ted Poe to pass Amendment 466 to defund the EPA attempt to regulate greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act. The proposed new regulations are estimated to cost up to 1.4 million American jobs over the next three years, a loss of U.S. manufacturing capacity, and higher consumer prices on food, gas, and utilities. The EPA has also used the issue to strip Texas of permitting ability, threatening the shutdown of construction projects in the Lone Star state. The Amendment passed by a 249-177 margin, with 236 Republicans and 13 Democrats in support.

"These Continuing Resolution wins are truly victories for democracy and the American voter," says Carter. "They are the ones who cast the deciding votes last November that made these actions today possible. I am pleased to be part of a House that listened to the people, and then did exactly what we said we would do."

The Continuing Resolution must now pass the Democrat-controlled Senate and be signed by the President before becoming law. If a Continuing Resolution is not signed into law by March 4 the federal government will run out of money and shut down.


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