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Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law Act

Floor Speech

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

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Ms. BALDWIN. Mr. Speaker, I rise today on behalf of hundreds of thousands of Wisconsin families who have already begun to benefit from health care reform. I am mindful of the children, young adults, and seniors who would lose access to affordable health care coverage should the measure Republicans are pushing today to repeal our recently passed health care law come to pass.

Over the years, I have heard thousands of stories from constituents about their struggles to find access to affordable health coverage. This year, my constituents' calls and letters have changed. They have transformed into stories of thanks and gratitude.

I think of Kate of Fitchburg, Wisconsin, whose family has already seen the benefits of this law in the short time its provisions have been in effect. Kate recently shared with me how her 16-year-old daughter, Maggie, had been unable to receive affordable health care coverage because she was born prematurely with a genetic anomaly that requires frequent doctors' visits. However, as a result of health care reform, Maggie is no longer denied health coverage because of her preexisting condition. Kate also has the peace of mind knowing that once her daughter becomes an adult, she can remain on Kate's health insurance until she turns 26.

Additionally, Kate's parents are both on Medicare and have fallen into the prescription drug doughnut hole. As a result of our recently passed health care law, they have already received additional help to pay for their medications.

Unfortunately, Kate's family would no longer enjoy these benefits should this measure we are considering today to repeal the health care reform law succeed. And Kate's family isn't alone. Under repeal, 147,000 young adults in Wisconsin would stand to lose their insurance coverage through their parents' health care plans. And once again, people would be discriminated against because of preexisting conditions. And 46,000 Wisconsin seniors would face higher prescription drug costs. I urge my colleagues to oppose this measure.

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