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Senate Passes Bunning, Udall, Alexander, Corker Resolution Honoring Sick Nuclear Workers with a National Day of Remembrance

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Location: Washington, DC

U.S. Senators Jim Bunning (R-Ky.), Tom Udall (D-N.M.), Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), and Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) today announced Senate passage of S. Res. 653, a Senate resolution designating October 30, 2010, as a National Day of Remembrance for Nuclear Weapon Program Workers. The Day of Remembrance honors the thousands of men and women who supported the nation's nuclear efforts during the Cold War.

"I could not be more grateful for our nuclear weapons program workers and uranium miners, millers and haulers for their dedicated service to our nation during the Cold War," said Bunning. "As a result of their hard work America emerged victorious, but many of these brave men and women developed illnesses and sacrificed their well-being because of their efforts to keep America safe. For this reason they deserve to be honored, which is why I introduced this resolution recognizing them for their patriotic service at a time when our country needed them most."

"Our nation's cold war veterans who dedicated their brainpower, livelihoods and unknowingly jeopardized their health to develop our nuclear deterrent, deserve this recognition," said Udall. "Behind the Manhattan Project at what would become Los Alamos National Laboratory were not only scientists, but many others like janitors, maintenance workers and miners and millers. They worked with and supplied the very substances that made them sick, and in too many instances ultimately led to their premature deaths. They -- and their families -- sacrificed tremendously for the security of America and for that we will always owe them a debt of gratitude."

"We won the Cold War in part because of the credibility of our nuclear deterrent," said Alexander. "That's why the United States Senate is recognizing the efforts of the thousands of Americans who worked behind the scenes -- more in Tennessee than in any other state -- to build that nuclear deterrent and who were exposed to hazardous elements that were little understood at the time."

"These civilian workers made great contributions to our national defense during the Cold War," Corker said. "It's appropriate that we dedicate a day to celebrate their achievements and to honor the sacrifices they made to help keep our country and its citizens safe."

The bipartisan resolution unanimously passed the Senate last night.


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