or Login to see your representatives.

Access Candidates' and Representatives' Biographies, Voting Records, Interest Group Ratings, Issue Positions, Public Statements, and Campaign Finances

Simply enter your zip code above to get to all of your candidates and representatives, or enter a name. Then, just click on the person you are interested in, and you can navigate to the categories of information we track for them.

Public Statements

9/11 Commission Report

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC


9/11 COMMISSION REPORT -- (House of Representatives - July 22, 2004)

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under a previous order of the House, the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Kingston) is recognized for 5 minutes.

Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Speaker, today we received the long awaited report from the 9/11 Commission, and the 9/11 report I think had some constructive ideas that we in Washington are going to listen to. It was a bipartisan group and they had a lot of good thoughts and some good discussion, and it was a unanimous report.

Three of the things that they said were our problems going into 9/11 was one, we did ignore a lot of red flags. Number two, the capacity that we had to fight terrorism, we were somewhat in the Cold War model and not using all of the technology or on-the-ground intelligence that we really need for this century. Number three, the management of information, the FBI not talking to the CIA, other agencies not sharing information led to lots of things going on and the right arm not knowing what the left arm was doing.

Finally, just our imagination, unable to really conceive of people who hated us so much that we did not know what they were plotting against us, that they were willing to kill themselves, they were instructed to kill Americans in order to get revenge on a country that had done them no harm.

Yet, indeed, if we look at some of the terrorist attacks leading into 9/11, as outlined by our colleague, the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Murphy), and I will submit this for the RECORD, it is unbelievable. November 1979, terror in Iran, American embassy attacked, hostages taken. April 1983, Beirut, 63 people killed from a truck filled with explosives driven into the United States embassy. October 1983, Beirut, 241 U.S. servicemen killed from a truck filled with explosives, driven through the main gate of a U.S. Marine Corps headquarters. September 1984, Beirut, a truck filled with explosives crashed through the gate of the U.S. embassy compound. October 1995, the Achille Lauro cruise ship hijacked, one American killed. November 1985, hijackers on an Egyptian plane kill U.S. passengers. December 1985, Rome and Vienna, 20 killed from suicide bombers at U.S. and Israeli international airports. April 1988, 259 killed in bombing of the Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. December 1992, Yemen, 2 killed from a bomb at Gold Mohur Hotel immediately after 100 U.S. servicemen departed. February 1993, World Trade Center, New York City, 6 deaths and more than 1,000 injuries. October 1993, 18 U.S. servicemen killed, Osama bin Laden claims he supplied weapons and fighters to the Somalians. 1994, New York City, investigators thwart the attempt to blow up Holland and Lincoln Tunnels and other New York City landmarks. 1995 Manila, Philippines investigators discover plots to assassinate the Pope and President Clinton during his visit to the Philippines.

This list, Mr. Speaker, goes on and on, and I am going to submit this for the RECORD. But again, one of the things the 9/11 Commission said is we could not imagine the whole concept of the war on terror. I think that what really happened on 9/11, we changed our views that terrorism is not a crime, but an act of war, and that these events, some isolated, are yet still linked together.

I think with some of the recommendations that they have come up with we will be able to avoid this in the future. In the meantime, we need to complete our job and our duty in Iraq. Iraq has harbored terrorists, and that was also in the 9/11 Commission Report. And we have a report that has come in; one year after being in Iraq, U.S. Agency for International Development talking about restoring the services there. This book, Mr. Speaker, which is available to the public, I do have a web page: www.usaid.gov, that is the U.S. Agency for International Development, it talks about reopening the schools there, building the democracy, vaccinating children, helping small businesses and newspapers to reopen. Lots of work is being done.

Iraq is an independent country at this point. It is on its own. We need to support them. We do not need to pull the rug out from under them. We need to help them complete their journey to democracy, and it is not time for Congress to pull the rug out from under them in the name of November politics.

MEMORANDUM

To: Members.
From: Tim Murphy (PA-18).
Date: July 21, 2004.
Subject: Timeline of major terrorist activities.

As we head home for the August recess and face questions from our constituents regarding the War on Terror, I thought you might find helpful this timeline of actual and attempted terrorist attacks.

November 1979--Tehran, Iran: American Embassy attacked and seized, hostages taken-released 1981.

April 1983--Beirut: 63 people killed from truck filled with explosives driven into U.S. Embassy.

October 1983--Beirut: 241 U.S. servicemen killed from truck filled with explosives driven through main gate at U.S. Marine Corps headquarters.

September 1984--Beirut: Truck filled with explosives crashes through gate into U.S. Embassy compound in Beirut, no deaths.

August 1985--Rhein-Main, Germany: 22 killed from car filled with explosives driven into main gate at U.S. Air Force Base.

October 1985: Achille Lauro cruise ship hijacked, one American killed.

November 1985: Hijackers on Egyptian plane kill U.S. passengers.

December 1985--Rome and Vienna: 20 killed from suicide bombers at U.S. and Israeli international airports.

April 1988: 259 killed in bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland.

December 1992--Aden, Yemen: Two killed from bomb at Gold Mohur Hotel immediately after one hundred U.S. servicemen departed on their way to duty in Somalia.

February 1993--World Trade Center, New York City: Six deaths and more than 1,000 injuries from bombing.

October 1993--Mogadishu, Somalia: 18 U.S. servicemen killed, Bin Laden claims he supplied weapons and fighters to Somalis involved in the battle.

1994--New York City: Investigators thwarted attempt to blow up Holland and Lincoln tunnels and other New York City landmarks.

Late 1994 early 1995--Manila, Philippines: Investigators discovered plots to assassinate the Pope and President Clinton during visits to the Philippines.

1995: Investigators discovered plans to explode a dozen commercial jets over the Pacific.

June 1995--Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Unsuccessful attempt to assassinate Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

November 1995--Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: Five Americans killed by car bomb at a U.S.-run training facility for the Saudi National Guard.

June 1996--Dhahran, Saudi Arabia: 19 U.S. airmen killed by truck bomb at the Khobar Towers apartment compound where hundreds of U.S. Air Force personnel were stationed.

August 1998--Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania & Nairobi, Kenya: 224 killed, including 12 Americans, and more than 5,000 wounded by truck bombs at U.S. embassies in both cities.

December 1999--Port Angeles, Washington: U.S. Customs agents stopped Ahmed Ressam from crossing out of Canada into the U.S. with a truck full of explosives headed to Los Angeles airport.

December 1999--Amman, Jordan: Intelligence officials reveal plot to kill U.S. and Israeli citizens by bombing a fully booked hotel and prominent Christian sites over millennium celebrations.

October 2000--Aden, Yemen: 17 sailors killed and 30 wounded when terrorists on boat rigged with explosives attack the U.S.S. Cole.

September 2001--New York City; Washington, DC; Shanksville, Pennsylvania: Thousands killed from four hijacked
passenger airliners crashed into New York City's two tallest buildings, the Pentagon and a field in rural Pennsylvania.

September 2001--Paris and Brussels: Intelligence officials uncover evidence of plots to bomb the U.S. embassy in Paris, and possibly also NATO headquarters in Brussels.

October 2001--Sarajevo, Bosnia: NATO officials break up an al-Qaeda cell planning to attack the U.S. embassy and Eagle Base airfield, home base to 3,000 U.S. peacekeepers.

December 2001: Richard Reid attempts to blow up a commercial flight from United Kingdom en route to United States using bombs hidden in his shoes.

March 2004--Madrid, Spain: 198 killed and more than 1,400 wounded from 10 coordinated bomb detonations on
Madrid subway during commuter rush hour.

Back to top