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Bayh Statement on United Nations Security Council Resolution Imposing Sanctions against Iran

Statement

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Senator Evan Bayh (D-IN) today issued the following statement after the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 1929, imposing a new round of sanctions against Iran.

"The resolution passed today is an important step in stopping Iran's quest for a nuclear weapons capability -- but it is not enough. We must now act quickly with our friends and allies around the globe to impose stronger additional measures on the Iranian regime, including sanctions targeting the regime's Achilles' heel -- its reliance on imported refined petroleum.

"Given Iran's consistent pattern of deceit, concealment, and bad faith, the only way to force Iran to abandon its nuclear ambitions is to make absolutely clear to the regime in Tehran that its current course will carry severe consequences. The United States and the international community must leave no doubt that we are prepared to do whatever it takes to stop Iran's nuclear breakout."

Senator Bayh, together with Senators Joe Lieberman (I-CT) and Jon Kyl (R-AZ), introduced the toughest economic sanctions legislation to date against the Iranian regime to pressure the regime to change course, comply with international law, and suspend its nuclear program, as demanded by multiple United Nations Security Council resolutions. This legislation, the Iran Refined Petroleum Sanctions Act (S. 908), was incorporated as part of the Comprehensive Iran Sanctions, Accountability and Divestment Act, which passed the Senate in January.

The Bayh-Lieberman-Kyl provisions would give President Obama expanded authority to impose severe economic penalties on foreign firms involved in the export of gasoline and other refined petroleum products to Iran, including a complete ban on doing business in the United States. Iran currently lacks the refining capacity to meet domestic consumption and must import as much as 40 percent of its gasoline from abroad.


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