Search Form
First, enter a politician or zip code
Now, choose a category

Public Statements

Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act, 2010

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC


FINANCIAL SERVICES AND GENERAL GOVERNMENT APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2010 -- (House of Representatives - July 16, 2009)

BREAK IN TRANSCRIPT

Mr. BERRY. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I certainly want to thank our distinguished chairman and ranking member of this committee and the staff that's done magnificent work preparing this bill and getting it to the floor. We all appreciate them and what they've done.

I try to never rise to speak that I don't encourage anyone that will listen to me to keep in their hearts and minds and in their prayers our men and women in uniform and their families. I am delighted to be here to not only hopefully defend this amendment against attacks but I have heard my friend from Arizona's complaints.

I would refer him first of all to article I, section 9 of the United States Constitution that says no money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in consequence of appropriations made by law.

It says, ``No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in consequence of appropriations made by law.'' I don't think the bureaucrats have the authority under the Constitution to appropriate money. That's the job of this Congress, this House, and the Appropriations Committee.

And I know my friend from Arizona means well. He has good intentions. He does these things in a spirit of camaraderie and never gets too vicious with his attacks. And I appreciate that. He is indeed a good fellow. But my mother used to tell me that the road to the bad place was paved with good intentions.

These people this truck driving course takes care of, the people that it makes possible for them to get trained, they're trained for good jobs that already exist. They're not going to get trained and then be out of work. They're going to be trained to operate vehicles over the Nation's highways in a safe manner.

This program helps to filter out any people that would not be suitable for that type work. That's part of what it does. This is a need that has existed for many, many years, and we have put lots and lots of State money, a lot of local money into this program and this community college, which does an outstanding job--and it has other programs where it trains people for jobs that already exist, and this is just one of its programs.

It would be absolutely foolish for us to deny this little bit of funding for a place that has worked so hard, has a very difficult time economically, and does only take up an effort to try to improve the lives of the people that want to work hard and participate in these programs and be trained for a good job.

And so I urge a ``no'' vote on this amendment, and I would urge my colleagues that choose to oppose earmarks--I like to call them Member-directed spending--but I think the Constitution is very clear on who's supposed to do that. If they would choose to be opposed to these Member-directed spending in these bills, then they need to go back to the Constitution and see where it says bureaucracy or bureaucrat or Federal agency or the executive branch or anything like that. It doesn't say that. It says the Congress has to pass these laws and make this money available.

So, I'm delighted to be here and appreciate the opportunity to speak against this amendment.

BREAK IN TRANSCRIPT


Source:
Skip to top
Back to top