Search Form
First, enter a politician or zip code
Now, choose a category

Public Statements

Sense of Congress Regarding Establishment of a Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month - Extensions of Remarks

Floor Speech

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC

Sense of Congress Regarding Establishment of a Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month - Extensions of Remarks

Mr. WYNN. Mr. Speaker, as the House of Representatives debates H. Con. Res. 134, a resolution expressing the sense of the Congress that there should be established a Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month to enhance public awareness of mental illness, especially within minority communites, I would like to submit the following eight endorsement letters for the Record.

May 20, 2008.

EDWARD S. HUBBARD, Jr., Esq.,

Senior Policy Advisor and Counsel,

Office of Congressman Albert R. Wynn.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: We, the members of the ``D.C. Divas,'' also make up the Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Task Force. We are writing to strongly urge you to support H. Con. Res. 134, which establishes the month of July as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month.

As friends and fellow advocates, we witnessed Ms. Campbell's tireless efforts to educate people throughout the country about mental health. Because a member of her family suffers with mental illness, she knew firsthand that the disease is a leading cause of disability in the United States. One out of every four American families is affected by mental illness.

In her own search for information and services, Ms. Campbell found compassionate support within the community of people, who like her, had loved ones struggling with the disease. She also discovered that minorities suffering from mental illness lack access to culturally and linguistically competent mental health care. Compounding these challenges are the cultural stigma associated with mental health diagnosis and treatment, and a dearth of education and resources for minority families supporting a mentally ill loved. Always one to do whatever she could to solve a problem, Ms. Campbell joined several other people from black communities in Los Angeles to found the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill--Urban Los Angeles.

Establishing July as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month will raise awareness about mental illness and mental health disparities among minorities nationwide. This modest effort will improve public health by encouraging the expansion of vital care in underserved communities in every state.

Ms. Campbell, a noted author whose works became New York Times bestsellers, died on November 27, 2006 of brain cancer complications. By this time, she had become a national spokeswoman for minority mental health issues, using her celebrity status and creativity to address the issues surrounding mental illness. Her last works before her death included the best selling novel ``72 Hour Hold,'' a book about a mother's struggle to get aid for her mentally ill daughter, and the children's book, ``Sometimes My Mommy Gets Angry,'' about a young girl whose mother is mentally ill.

The family of the late Ms. Campbell fully endorses this initiative and seeks the help of all Members of Congress in promoting this cause.

Again, as 13 of Ms. Campbell's friends from Washington, DC--and fellow advocates for mental health services, we know she would be honored to have her name attached to this effort. Mostly, though, she would be thankful for the congressional commitment to expand services in underserved communities.

Sincerely,

--

Rockville, MD, May 21, 2008.

Hon. Albert Wynn,

Rayburn House Office Building,

House of Representatives, Washington, DC.

DEAR CONGRESSMAN WYNN: On behalf of the National Council on Community Behavioral

[Page: E1121] GPO's PDF

Healthcare, representing 1,400 Community Mental Health Centers and other community mental health and substance abuse agencies serving over 6 million low-income Americans with mental illnesses and addiction disorders, I urge you to support H. Con. Res. 134, which establishes the month of May as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability in the United States, affecting one out of every four American families.

Today, minorities suffering from mental illness lack access to culturally and linguistically competent mental health care. Compounding these challenges is the cultural stigma associated with mental health diagnosis and treatment, and a lack of education materials and resources for minority families supporting persons and loved ones with mentally illness.

Establishing May as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month will raise awareness about mental illness and mental health disparities among minorities nationwide. This modest effort will improve public health by encouraging the expansion of vital care in underserved communities in every State.

Ms. Campbell, a national spokeswoman for minority mental health issues, made her transition on November 27, 2006. The late Ms. Campbell founded the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Urban Los Angeles and wrote books including the New York Times best selling novel ``72 Hour Hold,'' and the children's book, ``Sometimes My Mommy Gets Angry,'' which outline the devastating effects of mental illness on families and communities.

The members of the National Council join the family, friends and colleagues of the late Ms. Campbell, as well as members of Congress in fully promoting and endorsing one of the important legislation on minority mental health, the Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month.

Sincerely,

Linda Rosenberg,

President and CEO.

--

May 20, 2008.

Via e-mail: Ed.Hubbard@mail.house.gov

DEAR CONGRESSMAN ALBERT R. WYNN: The Urban Los Angeles Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) that is devoted to educating, supporting and advocating for individuals and families in communities of color challenged by mental illness diagnoses urges you to support H. Con. Res. 134, which establishes the month of May as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability in the United States, affecting one out of every four American families.

Today, minorities suffering from mental illness lack access to culturally and linguistically competent mental health care. Compounding these challenges is the cultural stigma associated with mental health diagnosis and treatment, and a lack of education materials and resources for minority families supporting persons and loved one with mentally illness.

Establishing May as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month will raise awareness about mental illness and mental health disparities among minorities nationwide. This modest effort will improve public health by encouraging the expansion of vital care in underserved communities in every State.

Ms. Campbell, a national spokeswoman for minority mental health issues, made her transition on November 27, 2006. The late Ms. Campbell founded the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Urban Los Angeles and wrote books including the New York Times best selling novel ``72 Hour Hold,'' and the children's book, ``Sometimes My Mommy Gets Angry,'' which outline the devastating effects of mental illness on families and communities.

The members of NAMI Urban Los Angeles join the family, friends and colleagues of the late Ms. Campbell as well as members of Congress in fully promoting and endorsing one of the important legislation on minority mental health, the Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month.

Sincerely,

NANCY CARTER,

Executive Director,

NAMI Urban Los Angeles.

--

May 20, 2008.

On behalf of the members of the Bebe Moore Campbell Minority Mental Health Task Force, we are pleased to endorse H. Con Res. 134 to recognize July as ``Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness and Treatment Month.

We acknowledge the critical importance of specifically addressing the mental health needs of minorities in a culturally competent and linguistically competent manner. We acknowledge and support the need for health equity so that all communities are able to receive equality of care, treatment and services.

In the spirit of working to reduce the stigma of depression and chronic mental health disorders, the task force recognizes the need for education in minority communities, that mental illnesses are diseases of the brain are treatable and are chronic conditions. We support needed intervention and treatment programs that seek to support the integration of mental health within the broader system of public health care.

The task force is committed to carrying the vision of Bebe Moore Campbell, a champion for the equality of mental health care in minority communities, whose tireless advocacy worked to establish NAMI--Urban Los Angeles and support a sustainable community health intervention model for communities of color that can be replicated across the country.

We encourage all Members of congress to vote a yes and offer our individual and collective voice to support H. Con. Res. 134 to eliminate disparate care in the mental health system and our communities at-large.

--

One Church, One Child

of Maryland, Inc.,

Baltimore, MD.

CONGRESSMAN ALBERT R. WYNN,

Rayburn Building,

Washington, DC.

DEAR CONGRESSMAN ALBERT R. WYNN: The One Church One Child of Maryland, Inc. is devoted to Adoption and Foster Care. We are also devoted to the physical, mental and spiritual health of children and families. As such, we endorse the promotion of strong mental health and endorse H. Con. Res. 134, which establishes the month of July as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability in the United States, affecting one out of every four American families.

Today, minorities suffering from mental illness lack access to culturally and linguistically competent mental health care. Compounding these challenges is the cultural stigma associated with mental health diagnosis and treatment, and a lack of education materials and resources for minority families supporting persons and loved ones with mentally illness.

Establishing May as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month will raise awareness about mental illness and mental health disparities among minorities nationwide. This modest effort will improve public health by encouraging the expansion of vital care in underserved communities in every State.

Ms. Campbell, a national spokeswoman for minority mental health issues, died on November 27, 2006 of brain cancer complications. The late Ms. Campbell founded the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Urban Los Angeles and wrote books including the New York Times best selling novel ``72 Hour Hold,'' and the children's book, ``Sometimes My Mommy Gets Angry,'' which outline the devastating effects of mental illness on families and communities.

The members of One Church One Child of Maryland, Inc. join the family, friends and colleagues of the late Ms. Campbell as well as members of Congress in fully promoting and endorsing one of the important legislation on minority mental health, the Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month.

Sincerely,

--

DEAR EDWARD S. HUBBARD, Jr. Esq. and CONGRESSMAN ALBERT WYNN: Thank you so much for moving forward this important and very personal bill. I am President of NAMI Urban LA (National Alliance on Mental Illness) and co founder of this chapter with my dear friend Bebe. Bebe as you know worked tirelessly to help educate and support our mentally ill community. Even when she became ill she was always talking of ways for us to raise money to support our cause. Her death was a huge blow to her family, friends, readers, and the world. When this bill passes it will help ease the pain of her loss. Our chapter continues to press on in her name. The month of July will now be even more special; celebrating the Declaration of Independence on the 4th and celebrating all month Bebe's importance in helping to liberate, support, educate and advocate for so many afflicted with mental illnesses.

Thank you so much again for this important bill.

Lynn J. Goodloe,

President, NAMI Urban LA.

--

University of Pittsburgh,

Chancellor of the University,

Pittsburgh, PA, May 20, 2008.

Hon. ALBERT WYNN,

c/o Edward S. Hubbard, Jr., Esquire,

Office of Congressman Albert R. Wynn.

DEAR CONGRESSMAN WYNN: I understand that you have taken the lead in sponsoring a bipartisan bill that would designate July as ``Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness and Treatment Month.'' I applaud your efforts and am writing, for myself and on behalf of the University to Pittsburgh, to strongly endorse this important piece of legislation.

As you know, Bebe Moore Campbell was a distinguished graduate of the University of Pittsburgh. She also served as a member of our Board of Trustees and was the recipient of an honorary doctorate from Pitt, the

[Page: E1122] GPO's PDF

highest honor that any university can bestow.

For most of her career, Bebe was best known for her literary achievements. Over the course of many years, her efforts as an author produced a succession of works that were both critically acclaimed and enthusiastically embraced by a large audience of readers.

In more recent years, she came to understand the special challenges presented by mental illness in this country, and particularly within the minority community, and she opened a new stage of her career as a mental health advocate. An important tool in her advocacy efforts was her literary skill. She applied that skill in a more focused way in the children's book Sometimes My Mommy Gets Angry and in the novel 72 Hour Hold. Through these works, she was able to advance important messages with different audiences.

Beyond her efforts as an author, she became a tireless and unusually effective advocate for the cause of mental health. In this work, she was able to empathetically present the challenges faced both by individuals suffering from mental illness and by the family members and others who care for them.

Naming the month of July as ``Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness and Treatment Month'' in her honor would he a well-deserved tribute to this tireless and selfless crusader. It also would help advance the cause for which she worked so hard and about which she cared so deeply.

Again, I applaud your efforts and .strongly endorse this important hill.

Sincerely,

MARK A. NORDENBERG.

--

American Psychiatric Association,

Arlington, VA, May 20, 2008.

Hon. ALBERT WYNN,

Rayburn House Office Building, House of Representatives, Washington, DC.

DEAR REPRESENTATIVE WYNN: I am writing on behalf of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), the medical specialty representing more than 38,000 psychiatric physicians nationwide, to express our support for H. Con. Res. 134, your resolution designating July as ``Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Month.''

Your resolution calls attention to the urgent national need for improved access to mental health care for all Americans. This is particularly true in minority communities, where access to the highest quality treatment is too-often limited.

APA is pleased to support H. Con. Res. 134, and commends you and Representative Diane Watson for your personal efforts on behalf of mental health care, both for minority populations and the U.S. as a whole.

Sincerely,

James H. Scully, Jr.,

Medical Director and CEO.


Source:
Skip to top
Back to top