Climate Change Puts Our Health at Risk!

Floor Speech

By:  Bob Filner
Date: April 8, 2008
Location: Washington, DC

Mr. FILNER. Madam Speaker and colleagues, last month news agencies around the world reported that more than 160 square miles of the Wilkins Shelf had broken away from the Antarctic coast. Americans are concerned that climate change may be happening faster than previously thought. We are growing increasingly concerned as we see before us the direct connection between climate change and our health.

It is now indisputable that there is a direct connection between climate change and health. The scientific community has decisively stated that human beings are responsible for climate change and that the impacts of climate change will worsen as emissions continue to rise. We must support and promote policies that strengthen public health leadership and work force capacity to ensure the infrastructure is in place and ready to handle our future needs.

The time has come to accept responsibility for how our lifestyles have contributed to climate change and vow to be part of the solution. We must work to learn more about how what happens in our home, community and workplace has global impact.

There are many little things we all can do to make a big difference. We can: Prepare for climate change-related emergencies and be informed about the health impacts of climate change and regional climate change issues facing our community. Leave the car at home and use public transportation, carpool,

Walk, bike, or telecommute. Eat less meat and buy local produce from our community farmers market. Use recycled paper, print less, use energy saving computer settings and green our office. Seal and insulate our homes, reduce, reuse, recycle and use water efficiently. We should know that we are all in this together. For over a decade, the first full week in April has been National Public Health Week. 50,000 members of the American Public Health Association and its affiliates, across the Nation are speaking out this week on climate change and health. That's because when it comes to climate change, our health is in the balance.