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Fox News "Fox and Friends" - Transcript

Interview

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Location: Unknown

MR. KILMEADE: We're going to be talking to -- it's a very special interview right now.

MS. HOPKINS: Yeah. Governor Mike Huckabee.

MR. DOOCY: Yeah.

MS. HOPKINS: He is standing by -- the former Arkansas governor.

Can you -- do we have him up?

MR. DOOCY: Yeah, I think --

Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee! I'm so sorry, sir. We just had to meet the Hooters girls. That's why we're a little delayed in getting to you. We apologize.

MR. HUCKABEE: Well, it's no problem. It's good to be back with you.

MS. HOPKINS: Good to see you.

The New York Times came out this morning endorsing Senator Clinton and Senator McCain. They didn't have a lot of nice things to say really about any of the Republican candidates, and they said you're disqualified because they say you inserted religion into the race. What do you say to that?

MR. HUCKABEE: Oh, that's nonsense. You know, what I've been talking about is implementing the fair tax, getting rid of the IRS, I mean, talking about rebuilding the infrastructure of this country.

It's not so much that I've injected religion into the campaign but everybody keeps wanting to ask me about it. I got questions again last night about my faith and it made some people queasy. I think it's a sad day in America when a person who has faith and who takes it seriously is suddenly criticized and is even dismissed because it makes somebody queasy. When in America is a person's faith supposed to make people unsettled? It's bizarre to me. I've been a governor 10-and-a-half years, a lieutenant governor three years. I never went around trying to replace the capitol dome with a steeple or doing anything that overtly smacked of pushing my faith on others, but I'm not going to run from it either, so I'm not sure where that comes from.

MR. KILMEADE: Right. Governor, you always have shined. Even Senator McCain and some of your opponents said that obviously, debates matter. Governor Huckabee earned it and earned the frontrunner status for a while -- and you're still up there -- because of how well you do in debates. But I was surprised -- with so much at stake and Florida five days away and Tsunami Tuesday straight ahead, you guys were so civil to each other. How did that happen? Was there a gentleman's agreement?

MR. HUCKABEE: You know, I don't think that there was any agreement. I think that all of us are trying to inject an air of civility into this. I know that particularly if you look at the ads that Rudy or Senator McCain or I have done, none of us have gone out and done negative advertising on each other. We've really through the entire process tried to keep it about what we would do for America, not what we would do to each other, and I think that people have respected that. I think they want that kind of civility. So I think it's just a matter of trying to be what we would call the "good Republicans" and obey Ronald Reagan's 11th commandment: Thou shalt not speak ill of another Republican.

MR. DOOCY: And apparently the 12th involves Democrats because last night a lot of hay was made about Hillary Rodham Clinton, the presumed nominee, I would imagine, on the Republican side. And one thing came out: She's not right for the economy and she'll raise your taxes. That's just a general thumbnail print of what was said last night. But Governor, with you, since the economy is on everyone's minds with the stock market all over the place this week and the big stimulus package, what would you do to stimulate the economy if you were in the White House right now, and is the president's plan enough?

MR. HUCKABEE: Well, I applaud the president and Congress for doing something, but as I mentioned last night, I think one of the challenges is we're about to borrow $150 billion from the Chinese, give the money to Americans in the form of a rebate check, and most of them are going to go and spend money on Chinese imports. And I'm wondering whose economy are we going to stimulate when we do it.

My suggestion is, if we look at the infrastructure system of this country -- our highway system, the airport system, our runways are clogged, our roadways are clogged; people are burning up fuel into the atmosphere, polluting the environment, never getting home to their kids for soccer games and dance recitals, and the productivity of this country is being lost as people are stuck in traffic. For the $150 billion, we could add two lanes to I-95 from Bangor, Maine, to Miami, and that would help alleviate some of this traffic congestion, put Americans to work with American steel, American concrete, and really stimulate the American economy.

I think that kind of thing does two things: stimulates the economy and also gives us a long-term benefit to our infrastructure.

MR. DOOCY: Sure. All right. Mike Huckabee, joining us from Boca Raton this morning.

Sir, thank you very much. Have a great weekend.

MR. HUCKABEE: Thank you.

MR. DOOCY: All right.

MR. KILMEADE: All right. And of course a big Tuesday.

END.


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