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CHAMP Act: Cleans Up Part D

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Location: Washington, DC


CHAMP Act: Cleans Up Part D

Final in a Series on the Children's Health & Medicare Protection Act of 2007
Washington, DC - U.S. Rep. Ron Kind (D-WI), member of the House Committee on Ways and Means,
today praised changes made to the Medicare Part D program in the Children's Health & Medicare Protection
Act of 2007 (CHAMP Act).
"The confusion surrounding the tremendously complicated Part D programs makes seniors vulnerable," Rep.
Kind said. "Many beneficiaries have trouble navigating the unnecessarily complex Part D drug program, and
the CHAMP Act includes provisions that will help seniors navigate the system and ensure they are on the plan
that best meets their medical needs."
The CHAMP Act makes improvements to the Medicare Part D program that will ensure all beneficiaries' access
to necessary drugs, reduce costs for certain beneficiaries, and enable low-income and adversely affected
beneficiaries to change plans any time. It also requires greater quality reporting to assure patients are getting the
best care available.
The CHAMP Act also adds new consumer protections. Under CHAMP, states will be given new authority to
ensure that insurance companies and insurance brokers selling "Medicare Advantage" and Medicare Part D
plans to Wisconsin seniors are not engaging in misleading or deceptive practices. The bill also increases
funding for aging specialists who help seniors navigate the system and work out any issues they encounter -
from finding the right Part D plan to ensuring the correct premium is being deducted from their Social Security
checks.
The CHAMP Act also improves access to important medications. Under current law, Part D plans are
specifically prohibited from covering a class of drugs used to manage health conditions including anxiety
disorders, seizures, and other medical conditions. The CHAMP Act allows Part D plans to cover these vital
drugs and others including: anticonvulsants, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and immunosupressants.


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