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Public Statements - Thompson Pushes His Plan for Iraq

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Location: Unknown - Thompson Pushes His Plan for Iraq

By Chris Dorsey

Former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson talked with WHO radio Friday morning about his three-part plan to deal with the situation in Iraq.

The newly formed government should pass a resolution saying it wants the U.S. in Iraq, Thompson said. He also suggests forming three separate governments - comprised of Sunni, Shiite and Kurds - that would fall under one national rule, similar to U.S. states. Lastly, like in Alaska, Thompson recommends that one-third of Iraq's oil revenues would be given back to every Iraqi.

"They will fight to make sure the oil wells keep productive," he said. "They will start working together."

Thompson also said the United States currently imports 61 percent of its oil. He said that volume of importation needed to be reduced in favor of renewable fuels.

"That makes our country weak," Thompson said referring to the dependence on foreign oil. "We depend on countries who hate America."

Thompson spent Friday morning visiting with media outlets and meeting with supporters. He is scheduled to return Sunday to Iowa City where he will attend the Wisconsin-Iowa college basketball game at Carver-Hawkeye Arena.

Thompson that Republicans must carry Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota in order to earn the presidency, and said he's the best candidate to do that.

The former governor touted his experience in Wisconsin, where he served in the Legislature for 20 years and as governor for 14 years. He resigned his governor's seat to become cabinet secretary for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in the Bush Administration.

That executive experience in the state and federal government makes him stand out in a crowded GOP field, Thompson said.

"I have unique qualifications that none of the other candidates have," Thompson said referring to his service in the state and federal executive branches.

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