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Public Statements

Opposition to Senate Immigration Bill

Floor Speech

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC


OPPOSITION TO SENATE IMMIGRATION BILL -- (Extensions of Remarks - May 25, 2007)

* Mr. MORAN of Kansas. Madam Speaker, I rise today to speak in opposition to the irresponsible immigration bill being considered in the Senate. As I travel around the big first congressional district in Kansas, the number one issue Kansans want to talk about is immigration. Across my home State and across the Nation, illegal immigration affects all aspects of life in our communities. Schools must deal with educating growing numbers of students who speak little or no English. Hospital emergency rooms grow even more crowded. Law enforcement work overtime to keep neighborhoods safe.

* While our immigration process is broken and needs dramatic overhaul, the legislation currently being debated in the Senate is not the answer. The Senate proposal is public policy at its worst. I oppose the Senate legislation. As I have said since this debate began, the first priority must be to restore the integrity of our borders. Without secure borders, the laws dealing with citizenship and worker permits are irrelevant.

* In addition to protecting the border, we also need a fair and efficient immigration agency that encourages compliance with our laws so that those who wish to come to the United States legally are able to do so in a timely and appropriate manner.

* I am more than willing to work with my colleagues to craft legislation that truly will address this country's immigration issue, but the compromise legislation pending in the Senate only exacerbates the problem.


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