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Observing the Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC


OBSERVING THE BIRTHDAY OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR

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Mr. BACA. Madam Speaker, I ask for unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks.

All of us here, representing Congress have the distinct honor and privilege of working in the one place where America's history meets the law of our land, the one place that displays the many historic monuments, memorials, and permanent images of our Nation.

One of the most powerful images in Washington for me is the image of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., conveying his dream during his 1963 ``March on Washington' on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Dr. King dedicated his life to achieving equal rights for all Americans and had a clear vision on that day in 1963 for what America should look like today.

Dr. King understood government has a fundamental responsibility to meet the needs of all Americans regardless of race or economic class. His vision was for true equal economic opportunity for all. In his ``I Have a Dream' speech, Dr. King spoke of the ``fierce urgency of now.' He said, ``This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism.' Those words were true in 1963 and continue to remain true today.

My Democratic colleagues and I are working hard to ensure that Congress fulfills its responsibility to realizing Dr. King's dream. Within these first 100 hours of this Congress, we have already passed legislation to make the American people safer, make our Congress more honest and open, make life better for our seniors, and to give a living wage to all Americans.

As our Nation celebrates Martin Luther King Day, we remember him as a beacon of change. Dr. King helped change America by leading the civil rights movement. He gave people the faith and courage to work peacefully for change to stop racial discrimination, and promote equality and opportunity across America. So on this day, and everyday, let us recommit to changing and working to bring about opportunity for all Americans.

Madam Speaker, as we celebrate Dr. King's birthday, let us carry out his vision for social justice, equality, and peace. Let us continue to work together for the common cause, in the effort of humanity and brotherhood, so all people may enjoy a better way of life and a higher dignity.

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